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Topic: William Rowan Hamilton


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In the News (Mon 17 Jun 19)

  
  Sir William Rowan Hamilton - LoveToKnow 1911
SIR WILLIAM ROWAN HAMILTON (1805-1865), Scottish mathematician, was born in Dublin on the 4th of August 1805.
Indeed there can be little doubt that Hamilton was intended by the university authorities who elected him to the professorship of astronomy to spend his time as he best could for the advancement of science, without being tied down to any particular branch.
Hamilton himself seems not till this period to have fully understood either the nature or the importance of his discovery, for it is only now that we find him announcing his intention of applying his method to dynamics.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Sir_William_Rowan_Hamilton   (1874 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Hamilton's mathematical studies seem to have been undertaken and carried to their full development without any assistance whatsoever, and the result is that his writings belong to no particular "school", unless indeed we consider them to form, as they are well entitled to do, a school by themselves.
Hamilton was not specially fitted for the post, for although he had a profound acquaintance with theoretical astronomy, he had paid but little attention to the regular work of the practical astronomer.
Hamilton was intended by the university authorities who elected him to the professorship of astronomy to spend his time as Hamilton best could for the advancement of science, without being tied down to any particular branch.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=William_Rowan_Hamilton   (2752 words)

  
 William Rowan Hamilton Summary
William Rowan Hamilton was born on Aug. 4, 1805, in Dublin, the fourth child of Archibald Hamilton, a solicitor, and Sarah Hutton Hamilton.
Hamilton was born in Dublin, the son of an attorney.
Hamilton detected an important defect in one of Laplace’s demonstrations, and he was induced by a friend to write out his remarks, that they might be shown to Dr John Brinkley, afterwards bishop of Cloyne, but who was then the first royal astronomer for Ireland, and an accomplished mathematician.
www.bookrags.com /William_Rowan_Hamilton   (6102 words)

  
 Coat-of-Arms of the mathematician William Rowan Hamilton (1805-1865) - Numericana
Hamilton was born in Dublin (at 36 Lwr.
In 1750, Gawen Hamilton of Killyleagh (1729-1805) married a widow, Jane, daughter of the barrister William Rowan (son of Capt. William Rowan of Derry).
Hamilton Écartelé: aux 1 et 4, de gueules, à trois quintefeuilles d'hermine (Hamilton); au 2, d'argent, à trois galères de sable; au 3, de sable, au chevron d'argent, acc.
home.att.net /~numericana/arms/hamilton.htm   (1802 words)

  
 William Rowan Hamilton
Hamilton's mathematical studies seem to have been undertaken and carried to their full development without any assistance whatever, and the result is that his writings belong to no particular "school," unless indeed we consider them to form, as they are well entitled to do, a school by themselves.
Hamilton's extraordinary investigations connected with the solution of algebraic equations of the fifth degree, and his examination of the results arrived at by N. Abel, G. Jerrard, and others in their researches on this subject, form another contribution to science.
Hamilton retained his faculties unimpaired to the very last, and steadily continued till within a day or two of his death, which occurred on the 2nd of September 1865, the task of finishing the “Elements of Quaternions”; which had occupied the last six years of his life.
www.mlahanas.de /Physics/Bios/WilliamRowanHamilton.html   (2637 words)

  
 William Rowan Hamilton: mathematical genius (August 2005) - Physics World - PhysicsWeb
William Rowan Hamilton was born in Dublin at midnight between the 3rd and 4th of August 1805.
Hamilton's other great interest was in the close relationship between the algebra of complex numbers and geometry, which was explored by Jean-Robert Argand and a number of other mathematicians at the beginning of the 19th century.
Hamilton was knighted during a meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in Dublin in 1835, and received many honours and distinctions in the course of his lifetime.
physicsweb.org /articles/world/18/8/7   (3224 words)

  
 Hamilton, William Rowan (1805-1865)
Hamilton did early work on caustic curves and was led from this to his discovery of the law of least action, which enabled many physical problems to be expressed more elegantly.
The idea for quaternions came to Hamilton suddenly on Oct. 16, 1843, while he was standing on Brougham ("Broom") Bridge, where Broombridge Street crosses the Royal Canal, Dublin; a plaque under the bridge, on the towpath, was unveiled by the Taoiseach (head of the Irish parliament), Eamon De Valera, on Nov. 13, 1958.
Hamilton's interest in complex numbers was stimulated by his friend and compatriot John Graves, who pointed Hamilton in the direction of John Warren's A Treatise on the Geometrical Representation of the Square Root of Negative Quantities.
www.daviddarling.info /encyclopedia/H/Hamilton.html   (807 words)

  
 Hamilton and his quaternions | Science.ie
Hamilton also did extremely innovative work in the mathematical modelling of light propagation through crystals and predicted a new phenomenon, known as conic refraction, entirely on the basis of his theoretical model.
However, Hamilton's greatest legacies are the important advances he made in the field of theoretical physics known as mechanics, which deals with the motion of objects under the influence of forces such as gravity.
Hamilton's work in mechanics took on even greater significance in the early part of the 20th century when it turned out to be critical to the development of quantum mechanics (QM).
www.science.ie /EN/index.cfm/section/sitePages/page/hamilton   (793 words)

  
 William Rowan Hamilton   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
By the age of 12, William was fluent in 10 languages and was appointed to a Mathematics Chair at the Royal Observatory in Dublin at a youthful age.
One of Hamilton's successes was in proving that Newton's Equations and Lagrangian Mechanics were equivalent when the Lagrangian was the difference between the kinetic and potential enrgy of a system.
Hamilton took Lagrange's action property and showed that the path a particle would take would be the path of least action.
www.cobalt.chem.ucalgary.ca /ziegler/educmat/chm386/rudiment/tourclas/hamilton.htm   (340 words)

  
 William Rowan Hamilton
William was born in Dublin on the 4th August 1805 to Archibald Hamilton, a solicitor, and Sarah Hutton.
William’s father was away a lot on legal business and William lived with his uncle, the Rev. James Hamilton, at Trim from 1808 to 1823.
This was attached to one of William’s toes when he retired for the night and James would tug the string early in the morning to remind his charge to begin his studies.
understandingscience.ucc.ie /pages/sci_williamrowanhamilton.htm   (895 words)

  
 Molecular Expressions: Science, Optics and You - Timeline - William Rowan Hamilton
By utilizing this function, Hamilton was able to mathematically address in detail caustic curves, the density of the light in close proximity to caustic surfaces, and the foci of reflected light.
Hamilton and Wordsworth also often engaged in lively debates about the nature of science and poetry, and whether or not there were parallels between the two seemingly divergent spheres.
It was not long after he was installed in Dunsink that Hamilton found that his real interests lie more in the realm of mathematics than astronomy, but as he was allowed to spend his time as Royal Astronomer in whatever manner he saw fit, he was able to indulge his personal preference.
www.microscopy.fsu.edu /optics/timeline/people/hamilton.html   (1152 words)

  
 SIR WILLIAM ROWAN HAMILTON
William Rowan Hamilton was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1805, and except for short visits elsewhere, spent his whole life there.
William proved to be a prodigy and by the time he reached the age of 13 he was fluently acquainted with thirteen languages.
Hamilton's career at the university was unique, for in 1828, when he was only 21 years old and still an undergraduate, the electors unanimously appointed him Royal Astronomer of Ireland, Director of the Dunsink Observatory, and Professor of Astronomy at the University.
www.engr.iupui.edu /~orr/webpages/cpt120/mathbios/hamil.htm   (1216 words)

  
 [No title]
William Rowan Hamilton was the greatest Irish mathematician and one of the initiators of abstract algebra.
The stamp depics, in Hamilton's own handwriting, the defining relations for the division ring (noncommutative field) of quaternions; division rings are fundamental objects in the theory of noncommutative rings.
It is reported that Hamilton was so delighted with his discovery of the quaternions that he carved these equations into a stone block on the Brougham Street Bridge.
www.math.wfu.edu /~kuz/Stamps/Hamilton/Hamilton.htm   (286 words)

  
 Sir William Rowan Hamilton
Hamilton devoted a lot of time to poetry, and constantly sought a link between the higher levels of science and poetry.
Wordsworth feared that Hamilton would concentrate his efforts on poetry, and generally seems to have felt it his duty to steer Hamilton away from poetry, telling him his talents lay in science.
Hamilton also predicted the unexpected phenomenon of Conical Refraction in biaxial crystals, which served to immediately highlight his name, and won him the Royal medal of the Royal Society, in 1835.
members.tripod.com /~Irishscientists/scientists/SIR.HTM   (1117 words)

  
 Hamilton biography
Hamilton's introduction to mathematics came at the age of 13 when he studied Clairaut's Algebra, a task made somewhat easier as Hamilton was fluent in French by this time.
Hamilton's finals examiner, Boyton, persuaded him to apply for the post of Royal Astronomer at Dunsink observatory even although there had already been six applicants, one of whom was George Biddell Airy.
Hamilton was so nervous in her presence that he broke the eyepiece of the telescope whilst trying to give her a demonstration.
www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk /history/Biographies/Hamilton.html   (2816 words)

  
 Sir William Rowan Hamilton
A branch of the Scottish family to which they belonged had settled in the north of Ireland in the time of James I, and this fact seems to have given rise to the common impression that Hamilton was by ancestry an Irishman.
It was in the successful effort to open this treasure-house that Hamilton's mind received its final temper, "Dès-lors il commença a marcher seul", to use the words of the biographer of another great mathematician.
Hamilton himself seems not until this period to have fully understood either the nature or the importance of his discovery, for it is only now that we find him announcing his intention of applying his method to dynamics.
www.nndb.com /people/951/000101648   (1831 words)

  
 Sir William Rowan Hamilton
Hamilton was quite a famous person and Dublin people came to know the ideas of quaternions even though they referred to them as ‘quart ‘er onions’ – a quart being a standard measure of beer or porter and they could never quite make out why onions had to be measured like this.
The genius of Hamilton was to realise that i times j would not produce the same result as j times i.
Hamilton wanted to know if he could extend this system to develop a system with three parts (thus involving real parts, i-parts and j-parts).
indigo.ie /~hallinan/Hamilton/Sir_William_Rowan_Hamilton.htm   (843 words)

  
 Hamilton   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Like Jacobi, Hamilton knew the formal connection between point mechanics and geometrical optics for which Fermat’s principle corresponds to the action principle for particles and light-ray surfaces of constant phase (which Hamilton called his “characteristic function”) are analogous to level surfaces of action.
Hamilton’s use of the eccentricity invariant of the Kepler problem occurred in relation to his application of the characteristic function to problems of celestial mechanics.
Hamilton’s other beautiful discovery was that of quaternions, a four-dimensional generalization of the two-dimensional complex variable.
faculty.rmwc.edu /tmichalik/hamilton.htm   (184 words)

  
 Sir William Rowan Hamilton — FactMonster.com
Hamilton, Sir William Rowan, 1805–65, Irish mathematician and astronomer, b.
A child prodigy, he had mastered 13 languages by the age of 13 and was still an undergraduate when he became professor of astronomy at the Univ. of Dublin (1827).
Hamilton was one of the most original and creative mathematicians of his time.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/people/A0822532.html   (197 words)

  
 Biography of Hamilton
Sir William Rowan Hamilton was a famous Irish mathematician and astronomer of the 19th century, known chiefly for his work in vector analysis and in optics.
Sir William Hamilton was born August 4, 1805 in Dublin, Ireland and died September 2, 1865 in Dublin.
Hamilton's father, Archibald Hamilton, did not have time to teach William as he was often away in England pursuing legal business.
www.andrews.edu /~calkins/math/biograph/biohamil.htm   (1194 words)

  
 Hamilton
In 1826 Hamilton received an 'optime' in both science and Classics, which was unheard of, while in his final year as an undergraduate he presented a memoir Theory of Systems of Rays to the Royal Irish Academy.
On 16 October 1843 (a Monday) Hamilton was walking in along the Royal Canal with his wife to preside at a Council meeting of the Royal Irish Academy.
Hamilton died from a severe attack of gout shortly after receiving the news that he had been elected the first foreign member of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
physics.rug.ac.be /fysica/geschiedenis/Mathematicians/Hamilton.html   (2670 words)

  
 Editorial - William Rowan Hamilton (Nov/Dec 2005)
Among these, surely, is the Irish physicist and mathematician, William Rowan Hamilton, whose contributions to the evolution of modern physics have yet to be quantified, and adequately recognized.
Hamilton, as well as being a genius, was also an inveterate scribbler and often without either the means with which to write or the material on which to compose.
It is not clear precisely how Hamilton's mechanics and the discovery of quaternions influenced the progress to space-time calculations and general relativity, but his work must have offered insights to those scientists involved in such evolving challenges in the late 19 th and early 20 th century.
www.cap.ca /pic/archives/61.6(2005)/editorial-f.html   (907 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Sir William Rowan Hamilton (Mathematics, Biography) - Encyclopedia
A child prodigy, he had mastered 13 languages by the age of 13 and was still an undergraduate when he became professor of astronomy at the Univ. of Dublin (1827).
Hamilton was one of the most original and creative mathematicians of his time.
In his Theory of Systems of Rays (1828) he predicted the existence of conical refraction (later confirmed experimentally by H. Lloyd) and unified the field of optics under the principle of varying action, which he later extended to dynamics and which has become of fundamental importance in modern physics, particularly quantum theory.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/H/HamiltWR.html   (304 words)

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