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Topic: Wills Creek (Maryland)


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In the News (Mon 19 Nov 18)

  
 searchp.pl
Wills Creek flowing between Western Maryland RR Station and Greene St/ looking toward Wills Creek Bridge at Baltimore St Cumberland
WVA Central RR Station at Baltimore St. and Wills Creek Bridge
Georges Creek and Cumberland R shops and roundhouse on N. Mechanic St. now site of Southern States bldg c.
www.ci.cumberland.md.us /cgi-bin/searchp.pl

  
 Cumberland, Maryland-West Virginia, Outdoors Recreation
Wills Creek, Maryland, Ellerslie to North Branch Potomac, 9 miles away, class I-II, 6.1 miles long.
Georges Creek, Maryland, Maryland Route 36 to North Branch Potomac River, 9 miles away, class III-IV, 10 miles long.
Evitts Creek, Maryland, Lake Gordon Dam to Maryland Route 51, 12 miles away, class I-III, 13.5 miles long.
www.hikercentral.com /metros/19060.html

  
 Maryland begins trophy trout program - The Washington Times: Sports - October 10, 2004
Western Maryland's delayed harvest areas that are published in your fishing license booklet will be or already have been stocked, as has Wills Creek in Allegany County and the Youghiogheny below Friendsville, in Garrett County.
Some waters in western and southern Maryland have already received a share of the trophy fish, and as soon as the water cools down in the eastern parts of the state, standard trout stocking along with some trophy-sized specimens also will begin.
Central Maryland's Patapsco at Sykesville and the Avalon area in the Patapsco River State Park are scheduled to receive a stocking.
www.washtimes.com /sports/20041010-124620-5872r.htm

  
 Preserve America Community: Cumberland, Maryland
Known as the "Gateway to the West," Cumberland (population 23,901) was established in 1787 at the mouth of Wills Creek on the Potomac River, on the edge of the Allegany Highlands of western Maryland.
In the mid- to late-19th century, Cumberland was Maryland's second largest manufacturing center, with such industries as glass-making, breweries, lumber, cleaning and dyeing works, and tinplate.
A downtown historic district is comprised of over 100 historic structures dating from the mid-19th to the early 20th century; a second, largely residential, district is centered on Washington Street.
www.preserveamerica.gov /PAcommunity-cumberlandMD.html   (483 words)

  
 Cumberland, Maryland Real Estate
Cumberland is a beautiful city situated along the confluence of Wills Creek and the Potomac River, nestled among the Appalachian Mountains.
Average house sales encompassing both Allegany County of Maryland and Mineral County of West Virginia (all within a 50 mile radius) are $70,000, although a variety of homes at all prices are available.
George Washington's headquarters is also right here in Maryland and is a definite must-see.
www.relocate-america.com /states/MD/cities/cumberland.htm   (771 words)

  
 Canal Place Heritage Area Comes To Life :: Weekend Adventures Magazine Online :: wamonline.com
Additional enhancements included the addition of a fountain and sculpture to the plaza in front of the Station and the extension of the brick walkway lining the platform area to connect with a new pedestrian bridge spanning Wills Creek.
In 1993 the State of Maryland created the Canal Place Preservation and Development Authority to oversee the preservation, development and management of the Canal Place Preservation District, a designated area within the City of Cumberland surrounding the Western Terminus of the CandO Canal.
Appealing to the promoters of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal (begun in Georgetown, Maryland in 1828) the City donated land for the Boat Basin, granted the Board indemnity from any flood damage, and gained a new opportunity as the Canal’s Western Terminus.
www.wamonline.com /summer2000/canalplace.htm   (956 words)

  
 Preserve America Community: Cumberland, Maryland
K nown as the "Gateway to the West," Cumberland (population 23,901) was established in 1787 at the mouth of Wills Creek on the Potomac River, on the edge of the Allegany Highlands of western Maryland.
In the mid- to late-19th century, Cumberland was Maryland's second largest manufacturing center, with such industries as glass-making, breweries, lumber, cleaning and dyeing works, and tinplate.
Cumberland gained prominence during the 19th century as a transportation center.
www.preserveamerica.gov /PAcommunity-cumberlandMD.html   (956 words)

  
 article1076.html
While en route to the fort, he also picked up others along the way, but when he arrived at Wills Creek (Cumberland today), he learned the sad news that fort in which they were heading to defend had already surrendered to the French.
Fort Necessity, at Great Meadows in Pennsylvania, and in Maryland, Fort Cumberland was built around what is now the City of Cumberland, and Fort Frederick, near Hancock.
Finally, after England won the war, most of the settlers who had left their homes in Western Maryland did not return.
www.marylandtheseventhstate.com /article1076.html   (956 words)

  
 archivists newsletter - Bulldog, Maryland State Archives
WA - Cumberland and Upper Town; Fort Frederick, Linton, Upper Antietam and Jerusalem; Lower Antietam and Sharpsburg; Marsh; Salisbury and Conocheague; Wills Town, Sand Creek, Skipton, Murleys Run and Elizabeth
MO - Linganore and Sugar Loaf; Lower Newfoundland, Rock Creek and North West (general and land); Middle Potomac, Lower Potomac and Georgetown (general and land); Sugarland and Upper Potomac; Upper Newfoundland and Seneca; Upper Potomac
KE - First (Lower Langford Bay and Eastern Neck), Second (Chestertown and Upper Langford Bay), Third (Chester and Worten), Fourth (Morgans Creek and Lower South Sassafras), Fifth Districts, both land and property for each.
www.mdgovpap.com /msa/refserv/bulldog/bull89/html/bull89a.html   (956 words)

  
 Cumberland Maryland Railroads, Cumberland Shops
The steeples on the hill is the location of the Virginia fort "Wills Creek" later renamed Fort Cumberland at the time of the Braddock Campaign.
WM's bridge from Maryland Junction WV is the first bridge.
Next is Blue Bridge to Ridgeley WV and finally the I68 overpass of Cumberland.
d_cathell.tripod.com /cmd8.html   (956 words)

  
 Descendants of John Ray in Maryland
I will that my son, James Ray be my Executor of this my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking and disannulling all Wills, bequests and Legacies by me made or given before the date hereof, affirming this and no other to be my last Will and Testament.
The births of the children of John Ray and Sarah Wilson are recorded in Prince George Parish, Rock Creek Congregation, which until 1748 laid in Prince George County, and from 1748 to 1776 in Montgomery County, with a part taking in what is now Rock Creek Park.
Mary Ray Steele at one time owned a tract of land now included in Rock Creek Park, Washington D.C. This land was sold to Caleb Perkins with the deed recorded February 5, 1831 for $2,000.
www.geocities.com /Heartland/Valley/1909/johnray.htm   (1653 words)

  
 Background of the Conflict - Fort Necessity National Battlefield
From its post a Wills Creek, now Cumberland, Maryland, the Company planned additional settlements and started to open an 80-mile wagon road to the Monongahela River.
When told the fort was in French hands, he resolved to push on to Redstone Creek and await further instructions.
Washington and his Virginians spent most of June opening a road from Fort Necessity to Gist's Plantation, a frontier settlement in the direction of the forks of the Ohio.
www.nps.gov /fone/fonehist.htm   (1653 words)

  
 A History of Floods in Cumberland, Maryland - Flood Protection Talk (FEBRUARY 13,1939)
There are seven railroad and five highway bridges across Wills Creek and the North Branch of Potomac River at Cumberland.
It is proposed to set the concrete wall structure back from the creek a distance of at least 40 feet.
The stage at Johnson Street Bridge was 13.3 feet above zero of the gage, the third highest of record at that gage, but it was 29.2 feet at the Wiley Ford Bridge or 0.1 above the stage in 1936.
www.mindspring.com /~jdevault/fptalk.htm   (1653 words)

  
 Fort Cumberland at Wills Creek on the Potomac River
Cumberland was an important site especially until Gen. Forbes captured Ft. Duquesne and cut off the French route from Canada to the Virginia and Maryland back country.
It became a Crown fort that was manned by both Col. Washington's Virginia Regiment and Gov. Shirley's Maryland soldiers.
The fort was harassed by Indians throughout the early years of the war, and the surrounding country was ravaged.
www.fortedwards.org /cumberl.htm   (1653 words)

  
 Westmoreland County Historical Society
The early part of Braddock’s route is very scenic starting with the impressive mountain ridges around Cumberland, Maryland, where Wills Creek meets the Potomac River.
In June and July of 1755, Major General Edward Braddock and his expedition of British and American troops traversed approximately 100 miles of American wilderness starting from their base at Fort Cumberland, Maryland, and ending at Braddock’s Field in Braddock, Pennsylvania.
To determine the exact course of Braddock’s Road in southwestern Pennsylvania, the authors consulted contemporary accounts of Braddock’s campaign and reports of later historians who researched the road.
www.starofthewest.org /html/vtrail.html   (647 words)

  
 Casselman River Garrett County Railroads Coal Grantsville Maryland Meyersdale Pennsylvania Salisbury Pennsylvania Somerset County Pennsylvania B&O Railroad
The railroad was basically the "best route" identified by the early surveyors, using Wills Creek from Cumberland up to the Eastern Continental Divide and then following Flaugherty Creek, Casselman River and the Yough to McKeesport.
In the meantime, other timber operations set up along the Jennings Brothers Railroad and in 1912 the railroad was separately chartered with the improbable name of Northern Maryland and Tidewater Railroad.
Eventually logging and coal mines extended its route to near Bittinger Maryland.
d_cathell.tripod.com /sal.html   (647 words)

  
 Western Maryland Railway,Allegany County, Narrows, Scenic Railroad
Wills Creek, the creator of the gap, has an extensive and steep watershed that cuts through two major Allegheny ridges, before making this 900 vertical foot gap through Wills Mountain.
C&P rails through LaVale are operational and the GC & C line still showed some rail above Narrows Park.
Tuscarora Sandstone is exposed at top of the Narrows.
www.geocities.com /d_cathell/nar.html   (239 words)

  
 THE DESCENDANTS OF GABRIEL AND ANNA MARGARETTA SCHULTZ OF THE PFALTZ, ALSACE, Germany
For their settlement the men chose the Kreutz Creek Valley, west of the Susquehanna River, which the Penns considered part of their grant from the King of England, but at the same time was claimed by Lord Baltimore as part of the Province of Maryland.
Christina Schultz was born 11/1/1705 and died 7/13/1758 and was buried 7/15/1758 in the Reformed Churchyard at Kreutz Creek.
Heinrich Schultz left 3 sons (Wills B230, Courthouse, York, PA).
homepage.mac.com /pmcreedon/websiterev/html/Murray/Schultz.htm   (239 words)

  
 Young Washington in Pennsylvania
He set out from Williamsburg, Virginia, on October 31, 1753, traveling first to Wills Creek (now Cumberland, Maryland), where he hired Christopher Gist to act as his guide.
On December 4, Washington and his unusual escort reached Venango (now Franklin), where French Creek enters the Allegheny River.
Young George Washington accepted without hesitation, and began his first endeavor on behalf of his country.
www.phmc.state.pa.us /ppet/youngwashington/page1.asp?secid=31   (481 words)

  
 Fort Cumberland at Wills Creek on the Potomac River
This dual presence precipitated the famous Dagworthy affair that caused Col. Washington to ride to Boston to petition for authority for him to Command at Ft. Cumberland even though Capt. Dagworthy of Maryland held a King's Commission.
It became a Crown fort that was manned by both Col. Washington's Virginia Regiment and Gov. Shirley's Maryland soldiers.
However, there is a log cabin along the banks of the river that the town of Cumberland maintains was once the office of Col. Washington.
www.fortedwards.org /cumberl.htm   (481 words)

  
 French and Indian War timeline, 1754-1758
On April 25, 1754, Washington wrote to Gov. Dinwiddie that Ensign Ward had arrived at Wills Creek with the news the French had ousted the Virginians from the Forks of the Ohio and were beginning to build a formidable fortification there.
July 10, 1756 Col. Washington holds Council of War at Ft. Cumberland to discuss the chain of forts that is to be built from the Maryland-Virginia border to the Virginia-North Carolina border.
In the spring William Trent and Ensign Ward were ordered to the Forks of the Ohio River to begin building a fort.
www.fortedwards.org /f-i-war.htm   (481 words)

  
 The C&O Canal: Part I
The canal stretched from Georgetown (in Washington DC, across the road from what is now the Watergate Hotel (yes, the Watergate Hotel) to the confluence of Wills Creek with the Potomac in Cumberland, MD, a distance of 185 miles.
They proposed building a canal along the Potomac's Maryland shore, from tidewater at Georgetown- which was then a thriving port town - up to Cumberland, MD, then across land to Ohio River waters, connecting with the Ohio itself at Pittsburgh after 360 miles.
The canal's operating days, which extended until 1924, were greatly affected by the floods that periodically washed through the Potomac Valley, and by the railroad, with which the Canal was often at conflict with over rigths of way.
members.aol.com /mjtrekker/candocanal.html   (481 words)

  
 Western Maryland Railroad Station
Passengers of the Western Maryland Railway arrived in Cumberland overlooking a railroad station dramatically placed in a river valley where the Potomac River meets Wills Creek.
Today, the Western Maryland Station remains active and utilized as the headquarters of the Canal Place Preservation Authority and the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad.
An imposing nine bays wide, the railroad station is surrounded by a heavy modillioned brick cornice located just under the roof line.
www.cr.nps.gov /nr/travel/cumberland/wmd.htm   (410 words)

  
 A Rout in the Wilderness
Moving his troops from Wills Creek (now Cumberland, Maryland) he reached an area known as the Great Meadows, about sixty miles from Fort Duquesne, and had his men set up camp.
Throughout the first half of the 18th Century the French and the British were locked in a battle for control of the eastern half of the North American continent.
Fearing retaliation, Washington immediately withdrew to Great Meadows and had his weary men build a structure he called the “fort of necessity”.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/ventures_into_us_history/109601   (430 words)

  
 THE DESCENDANTS OF GABRIEL AND ANNA MARGARETTA SCHULTZ OF THE PFALTZ, ALSACE, Germany
For their settlement the men chose the Kreutz Creek Valley, west of the Susquehanna River, which the Penns considered part of their grant from the King of England, but at the same time was claimed by Lord Baltimore as part of the Province of Maryland.
He died in 1829 in Manchester, MD. His will was probated 1/26/1829 in the Orphans Court of Baltimore, MD (Wills Q-229).
Conrad Shultz was the founder of the firm of Shultz, Konig and Co. of Baltimore MD, located at 248 W. Baltimore St. His residence was on Pratt W. of Baltimore St., a very fine residential district at that time.
homepage.mac.com /pmcreedon/websiterev/html/Murray/Schultz.htm   (430 words)

  
 Personal Genealogy Web Pages
TLC Genealogy: genealogy books on colonial Virginia, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, New Jersey, Missouri, Mississippi, Wisconsin, wills, deeds, tax lists, court orders etc.
Pennsylvania Infantry,Battle reports and roster,biographies,photos battle reports of Gettysburg,Williamsburg,Fredericksburg,Spotsylvania,and Cedar Creek.Midi music and poetry more.
Since Pennsylvania was the starting point for the majority of early Quaker families, most people with Quaker ancestry will eventually find themselves researching Pennsylvania Quakers, and you should not overlook the large manuscript collections of previous Pennsylvania researchers.
www.geocities.com /geojenk/personal1.html   (3219 words)

  
 Young Washington in Pennsylvania
He set out from Williamsburg, Virginia, on October 31, 1753, traveling first to Wills Creek (now Cumberland, Maryland), where he hired Christopher Gist to act as his guide.
The future of the Colonies was at stake in 1753 when a French army, proceeding from Canada, invaded the upper Allegheny Valley in the opening thrust to control the Ohio River Valley.
The energetic Robert Dinwiddie, governor of Virginia, was quick to challenge this aggressive advance upon land claimed by the British king and by Virginia.
www.phmc.state.pa.us /ppet/youngwashington/page1.asp?secid=31   (481 words)

  
 Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania: History 2
Washington and Van Braam met with Gist at his outpost at the mouth of Wills Creek on the Potomac River, where Cumberland, Maryland is today.
That night, they resumed their hike down the Venango Trail along what is now the Franklin Road in Cranberry Township.
Late on the night of December 27, 1753, two men trudged wearily through the snowy forests in what is now Cranberry Township.
www.mytownship.org /information/history/htext2.html   (481 words)

  
 Davis-Drew
William Davis, born say 1725, a "Molatto," was listed with 180 acres at the head of Chinquopin Creek in a 1753 Craven County list of landowners [Craven Wills, Deeds, Bonds, Inventories, Accounts of Sales, 306].
William Smith travelled to Maryland to prove their claim, and they were free by November 1756 when James Dove, a "Negro Servant," complained to the Craven County court that Smith was mistreating him, Nelly, Sue, Sarah, Moll, and William Dove [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, IV:11-12, 366].
William and Tamer were found dead six years later on 5 March 1822 when a coroner's jury was appointed by the Northampton County court to determine the cause of death [Minutes 1821-25, 84].
www.freeafricanamericans.com /Davis_Drew.htm   (481 words)

  
 Western Maryland Railroad Station
Passengers of the Western Maryland Railway arrived in Cumberland overlooking a railroad station dramatically placed in a river valley where the Potomac River meets Wills Creek.
Ironically, the Western Maryland Railway eventually fell into the hands of the B&O Railroad in the 20th century, and was closed in the 1970s.
In 1902, the Western Maryland fell into the hands of the Gould railroad family, and the railroad finally reached Cumberland in 1906.
www.cr.nps.gov /nr/travel/cumberland/wmd.htm   (481 words)

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