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Topic: Zeno of the Byzantine Empire


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  Byzantine Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centred at its capital in Constantinople.
The Eastern Empire was largely spared the difficulties of the west in the 3rd and 4th centuries (see Crisis of the Third Century), in part because urban culture was better established there and the initial invasions were attracted to the wealth of Rome.
The Latin Empire, the Empire of Nicaea, the Empire of Trebizond and the Despotate of Epirus
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Byzantine_Empire   (4378 words)

  
 Zeno (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Zeno was compelled to shut himself up in a fortress and spent the next 20 months raising an army, largely made up of fellow Isaurians, and marched on Constantinople in August 476.
Zeno got rid of the problem in 487 by inducing him to invade Italy to fight Odoacer and establish his new kingdom there, all but eliminating the German presence in the east.
Zeno is described as a lax and indolent ruler, but he seems to have husbanded the resources of the empire so as to leave it appreciably stronger at his death.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Zeno_of_the_Byzantine_Empire   (1053 words)

  
 Zeno of the Byzantine Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Zeno was compelled to shut himself up in a fortress and spentthe next 20 months raising an army, largely made up of fellow Isaurians, and marched on Constantinople in August 476.
Restored to rule of the entire empire, Zeno was within two months forced to make a momentous decision when Odoacer deposed the last emperor in the west and asked for Zeno's recognition as a patricianofficer of Zeno's court, intending to rule without an emperor.
Zeno is described as a lax and indolent ruler, but he seems to have husbanded the resources of the empire so as to leave itappreciably stronger at his death.
www.therfcc.org /zeno-of-the-byzantine-empire-54167.html   (1004 words)

  
 Zeno of the Byzantine Empire: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Zeno of the Byzantine Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Although designed by Leo to secure the Isaurian support against the aforementioned ambitious minister Aspar, this political arrangement brought them a son, who was a boy to became the emperor Leo II upon the death of his grandfather in 473.
By recognizing Geiseric as an independent king and with the full extent of his conquests, Zeno was able to hammer out a peace which ended the Vandal attacks in the east, brought freedom of religion to the Catholics under Vandal rule, and which lasted for more than 50 years.
In ecclesiastical history Zeno is associated with the Henoticon[?] or instrument of union[?], promulgated by him and signed by all the Eastern bishops, with the design of terminating the Monophysite controversy.
www.encyclopedian.com /ze/Zeno-I.html   (1064 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire - All About Turkey
The Byzantine Empire is also known as the Eastern Roman Empire, for it was in fact a continuation of the Roman Empire into its eastern part.
For 1100 years, the Byzantine's were able to maintain control of their empire, although somewhat tenuously at times; the Empire's expansion and prosperity were balanced by internal religious schisms (such as Nika Riot) and recurring wars with enemies from the outside.
The Byzantine Empire, however, had left its mark on the culture, never to be entirely erased even after the Conquest.
www.allaboutturkey.com /bizans.htm   (423 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The core of the empire consisted of the Balkan Peninsula (i.e., Thrace, Macedonia, Epirus, Greece proper, the Greek isles, and Illyria) and of Asia Minor (present-day Turkey).
The reigns (395–527) of Arcadius, Theodosius II, Marcian, Leo I, Leo II, Zeno, Anastasius I, and Justin I were marked by the invasions of the Visigoths under Alaric I, of the Huns of Attila, and of the Avars, the Slavs, the Bulgars (see Bulgaria), and the Persians.
The reconstructed empire was soon attacked from all sides, notably by Charles I of Naples, by Venice, by the Ottoman Turks, by the new kingdoms of Serbia and Bulgaria, and by Catalonian adventurers under Roger de Flor.
www.bartleby.com /65/by/ByzantinEmp.html   (1302 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: The Byzantine Empire
The decline of the Byzantine Empire is strikingly exhibited in the depreciation of currency during the reigns of the Comneni.
Byzantine civilization produced a succession of typical women of middle class who are a proof, first, of the high esteem in which women were held in social life and, secondly, of the sacredness of family life, which even now distinguishes the Greek people.
Upon this motive, the Emperor Zeno closed the Nestorian school at Edessa, in 489 and it was a part of the same policy that induced the successors of Constantine the Great to support the leaders of the Christian clerical party, the Mamikonians, in opposition to the Mazdeistic nobility.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/03096a.htm   (16935 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Byzantine Empire (Native Greek names: ΡΩΜΑΝΙΑ Romania or ΒΑΣΙΛΕΙΑ ΡΩΜΑΙΩΝ Basileia Romaion or Βυζάντιο Byzantium) is the term conventionally used to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centred at its capital in Constantinople.
Byzantines identified themselves as Ρωμαίοι (Rhomaioi - Romans) which had already become a synonym for a Έλλην (Hellenes - Greeks), and more than ever before were developing a national consciousness, as residents of Ρωμανία (Romania, as the Byzantine state and its world were called).
The Normans finally completed the Byzantine expulsion from Italy in 1071, and the Seljuk Turks, who were mainly interested in defeating Egypt under the Fatimids, still made moves into Asia Minor, the main recruiting ground for the Byzantine armies.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/B/Byzantine-Empire.htm   (3596 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire
The Byzantine Empire was a continuation of the Roman Empire, which was split towards the end of the 4th century; the eastern part became the Byzantine Empire.
The name Byzantine Empire is an academic term, used to differ this empire from the former Roman.
The empire saw a period of cultural, territorial and economic advances in the 10th and 11th centuries.
i-cias.com /e.o/byz_empire.htm   (649 words)

  
 Encyclopedia article on Byzantine Empire [EncycloZine]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople.
Byzantines identified themselves as Ρωμαίοι (Rhomaioi - Romans) which had already become a synonym for a Έλλην (Hellene - Greek), and more than ever before were developing a national consiousness, as residents of Ρωμανία (Romania, as the Byzantine state and its world were called).
The empire's victory in the two giant sieges of Constantinople in the seventh and eighth centuries is arguably one of the most important events in human history, since it effectively broke the will of the Arab jihadists.
encyclozine.com /Byzantine   (3508 words)

  
 Kingdoms of Greece - The Byzantine Empire
As the Western Empire declined in the face of barbarian incursions and settlement, the Eastern Empire survived and, for some periods, actually thrived.
The citizens of the Eastern Empire thought of themselves as the true survivors and descendants of Rome, and called themselves Romans until at least the end of the first millennium.
The Byzantines withdraw to Nic├Ža in Anatolia, but rival claimants also established holdings in Trebizond and Epirus so that, at one point, there are four claimants to the Byzantine throne, as well as the Bulgar and Serb states.
www.kessler-web.co.uk /History/KingListsEurope/GreeceByzantium.htm   (478 words)

  
 [No title]
In the Arthurian legends, the Byzantine empire was a distant and mundane place, whose power was faint in comparison to Arthur's mystical and blessed kingdom.
In addition, they are marked as "Minor" in the sense that most Arthurian characters who came from the the Byzantine empire were minor characters: Sagramore le Desirous was a Prince of Hungary of royal Byzantine blood, Prince Alexander was the son of an ahistorical "Emperor Alexander" and "Empress Tantalis" who married Soredamor (mother of Cliges).
Although the term "byzantine" is synonymous with "scheming" to us, most of the nobles of Constantinople work under at least a facade of honesty.
www.employees.org /~pcorless/pendragon/justinian-clan.txt   (836 words)

  
 Roman and Byzantine Emperors   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
When he was about eighteen, Michael tired of the influence of his mother and "she retired without a struggle, though not without a murmur, to the solitude of private life, deploring the ingratitude, the vices, and the inevitable ruin of the worthless youth [her son]".
The second portion of the Empire in importance consisted of the rich and populous city of Thessalonica, with the western part of the Macedonian Chalkidike and its three peninsulas of Cassandra, Longos, and Agionoros.
The Ottoman Empire was shattered and the four sons of the captured sultan, Bayezid, contented for the possession of their European provinces.
users.tibus.com /decline-and-fall/emperors.htm   (7735 words)

  
 Historical diagram: Byzantine Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Creation of the Latin Empire of Constantinople and foundation of several Latin states in Hellas; a number of territories was placed under the rule of Venice due to its major contribution to the whole operation.
Predominance of the Empire of Nikaia in the ensuing conflicts.
Decline of the restored Byzantine “Empire” and further reduction of its territory mainly due to the conquests of the
www.culture.gr /2/21/214/21401m/presveis/Pages/info/Reference/HisByz.html   (805 words)

  
 The Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
This covers the various phases of the Roman Empire: the original, the Western, the Eastern (Byzantine), and the Holy Roman Empire.
It is also worth noting, for it is a fact neglected even by some professional historians, that the Byzantine Empire retook the City of Rome from the Ostrogoths in 553, and held it for the next 200 years.
The Western division of the Empire, encompassing Rome itself together with Italy, Gaul, Britain, Iberia, and northwestern Africa, was utterly unable to maintain itself in the face of overwhelming barbarian invasion/migration.
www.hostkingdom.net /empire.html   (1704 words)

  
 Zeno of the Byzantine Empire : Zeno I
terms defined : Zeno of the Byzantine Empire : Zeno I
All is still licensed under the GNU FDL.
A FAMOUS painter, jealous of his wife; When going on a journey used his art, (Umbilical, 'tis said) and like a seal: Now took advantage, and declared his flame: Another soon howe'er he had begun, In painting, few more praises ever got; A saddle, where before he none could trace.
www.termsdefined.net /ze/zeno-i.html   (1181 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Odoacer (Ancient History, Late Roman And Byzantine, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Odoacer defeated the Roman general Orestes at Piacenza, took Ravenna (the West Roman capital), and deposed Romulus Augustulus, last Roman emperor of the West (until the coronation in 800 of Charlemagne).
Emperor Zeno of the East, considering himself heir to the West Roman Empire, reluctantly recognized Odoacer's authority over Italy and granted him the title of patrician.
In 488, Zeno sent Theodoric the Great, king of the Ostrogoths, into Italy to expel Odoacer.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/O/Odoacer.html   (341 words)

  
 Verina   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Aelia Verina (died 484) was the wife of Byzantine emperor Leo I of the Byzantine EmpireLeo I, and the mother-in-law of Zeno of the Byzantine EmpireZeno/, who was married to her daughter Ariadne.
She originally supported Zeno while the young emperor Leo II was still alive, but after Leo II's death in 474 she turned against her son-in-law.
She conspired against him with her lover Patricius, her brother Basiliscus, the Isaurian general Illus, and general Theodoric Strabo, forcing Zeno to flee Constantinople in 475.
www.infothis.com /find/Verina   (340 words)

  
 Coins of the Byzantine Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
It is a period of longevity almost unrivalled in history; and yet, until recently it is a period written off by historians as merely the extended decline and fall of the Roman Empire.
The legendary wealth of Constantinople, with its sublime craftsmanship and awesome golden mosaics, (the "Sages standing in God's Holy fire," of Yeats' much quoted poem,) was coupled with a spirituality that dictated penance and abstinence even for a soldier who had killed in battle.
The Istanbul Archaeological Museum holds one of the great collections of Byzantine artifacts, all uncovered during excavations and construction projects in the city and its environs.
www.wegm.com /coins/byindex.htm   (326 words)

  
 474   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
February 9 - Zeno crowned as co-emperor of the Byzantine Empire
November 17 - The death of Leo II leaves Zeno sole Emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire; his mother-in-law Verina conspires against him.
Forty-five years of conflict between the Roman Empire and the Vandals end when the eastern Roman Emperor Zeno's envoys conclude a peace with King Geiseric.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/4/474.htm   (171 words)

  
 Coinage of the Byzantine Empire
The imperial portrait did not need to bear a close physical resemblance to the emperor because it referred to his "eternal body," not to his actual features.
This helps to explain the stereotyped hieratic image on most Byzantine coins.
The tradition of dynastic legitimation is clearly illustrated on the coins of Heraclius (610–41).
www.doaks.org /CoinExhibition/uses/Uses4Main.html   (227 words)

  
 Byzantine-msg
It was an amazing empire - one that was comprised of many different cultures, and stretched over more that a millenium.
If you wish to have a Byzantine persona, and do it well, you really need to nail down a time and region of the Empire you would have lived in.
The Byzantine Empire was established around 330 and lasted until 1453.
www.florilegium.org /files/CULTURES/Byzantine-msg.html   (3220 words)

  
 zeno - about zeno   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
architect, ireland, zeno, winkens, wexford, architects, zeno winkens, wap, zowap, riba, riai, county wexford, co. wexford, east coast, south east, sunny, leinster, waterford, waterford city, co. waterford, wicklow, co. wicklow, irish, german, germany
*Zeno of the Byzantine EmpireEmperor Zeno of the Byzantines (d.
491 CE), Emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire 474-491.
gift.loveportraits.net /zeno.htm   (140 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Rulers of the Byzantine Empire (table) - Encyclopedia
You are here : AllRefer.com > Reference > Encyclopedia > Ancient History, Late Roman And Byzantine > Rulers of the Byzantine Empire (table)
Rulers of the Byzantine Empire (table), Ancient History, Late Roman And Byzantine
More articles from AllRefer Reference on Rulers of the Byzantine Empire (table)
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/B/ByzEmpTABLE.html   (144 words)

  
 1.2.2.9a The Late Empire
Classical Coins offers ancient coins - Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Persian coins for collectors.
In contrast to the turmoil in the West, the wealthier and more populous Eastern Empire enjoyed a century of relative peace under five effective emperors.
The last, Anastasius, introduced a coinage reform in 498 that ended the Roman series and begins the Byzantine Empire.
www.classicalcoins.com /page61.html   (136 words)

  
 Zeno of the Byzantine Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Zeno of the Byzantine Empire
Zeno of the Byzantine Empire
article at Free Euro Online Encyclopedia
It uses material from the wikipedia article Zeno of the Byzantine Empire.
www.eurofreehost.com /ze/Zeno_of_the_Byzantine_Empire.html   (340 words)

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