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Topic: Zheng He


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
  Chinese Mariner Zheng He [Cheng Ho]
Zheng He (1371-1435), or Cheng Ho, is arguably China's most famous navigator.
Zheng He died in the tenth year of the reign of the Ming emperor Xuande (1435) and was buried in the southern outskirts of Bull's Head Hill (Niushou) in Nanjing.
In 1985, during the 580th anniversary of Zheng He's voyage, his tomb was restored.
www.chinapage.com /zhenghe.html   (367 words)

  
 The Admiral Of the Western Seas — Cheng Ho (Zheng He)
Zheng He described how the emperor of the Ming Dynasty had ordered him to sail to "the countries beyond the horizon," all the way to the end of the earth." His mission was to display the might of Chinese power and collect tribute from the "barbarians from beyond the seas."
Zheng He is described in Chinese historical records as tall and heavy, with "clear-cut features and long ear lobes; a stride like a tiger's and voice clear and vibrant." He was well liked and admired for his quick wit in argument.
Zheng He had started the process that might have led the Middle Kingdom to greater glory Unfortunately the rulers of the Ming Dynasty refused to follow his lead.
planet.time.net.my /CentralMarket/melaka101/chengho.htm   (2409 words)

  
 The Seoul Times
Zheng He was born in the poor, mountainous Chinese province of Yunnan in 1372, just as Genghis Khan's Mongols were being overthrown by a new, home-grown dynasty, the Ming.
Zheng He, Chinese admiral — Illustration from a printed fictional account of the sea voyages of the Chinese eunuch Zheng He (1371-1433), with a caption alongside.
Zheng He's greatest legacy is the vast diaspora of Chinese entrepreneurs who, with Zheng He as inspiration, broke with imperial edicts and the classical Confucian custom of staying near home and ancestry to seek out lives of commerce in foreign lands.
theseoultimes.com /ST/db/read.php?idx=1983   (2698 words)

  
 People's Daily Online -- Why do we commemorate Zheng He?
Zheng He's contribution not only lies in his spread of the Chinese "land civilization'', but also in the fact that he opened a new era and offered precious experience to the take-off of the "maritime civilization''.
Accordingly, one of the modern revelations of Zheng He's spirit is that we should march forward along the path of reform and opening-up and open a brand-new road of peaceful development by observing the world with a broad view of the "maritime civilization'' and embracing the world with a "maritime civilization'' heart.
Zheng He led the ancient world history and the friendly exchanges among different nations, setting a shining example of the history of the exchanges of human civilization.
english.people.com.cn /200507/12/eng20050712_195660.html   (685 words)

  
 Maritime Topics on Stamps, Zheng He voyages with the treasure ships
Zheng He was born in the year 1371 in a town called Jinning today - in Yunnan province of China.
In 1411 Zheng He intervened on Sri Lanka in a local conflict and was forced to conduct his only land battle, which he won with a stroke of genius.
Zheng He could still begin his last voyage in 1431 but when it returned the treasure ship fleet was docked forever.
www.shipsonstamps.org /Topics/html/zhenghe.htm   (1822 words)

  
 Zheng He Bio   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Zheng He, whose name is sometimes romanized as Cheng Ho, was born to a Moslem family in Yunnan province in about 1371.
When Zheng He was about ten years old, he was selected as to serve as a eunuch in the court and was castrated.
Zheng He played an important role in the civil war which placed the Yongle emperor on the throne, thereby gaining the emperor's trust.
www.hist.umn.edu /hist1012/primarysource/zhengbio.htm   (126 words)

  
 NOVA Online | Sultan's Lost Treasure | Ancient Chinese Explorers
Zheng He commemorated his adventures on a stone pillar discovered in Fujian province in the 1930s.
While Zheng He lingered in the city to amass treasure for the emperor, another branch of the fleet sailed to the kingdom of Bengal in present-day Bangladesh.
Toward the end of his seventh voyage in 1433, the 62-year-old Zheng He died and was said to have been buried at sea.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/nova/sultan/explorers2.html   (742 words)

  
 Maritime Topics on Stamps, Zheng He voyages with the treasure ships
Zheng He was born in the year 1371 in a town called Jinning today - in Yunnan province of China.
In 1411 Zheng He intervened on Sri Lanka in a local conflict and was forced to conduct his only land battle, which he won with a stroke of genius.
Zheng He could still begin his last voyage in 1431 but when it returned the treasure ship fleet was docked forever.
www.palouse.net /hobbies/shipstamps/Topics/html/zhenghe.htm   (1822 words)

  
 Zheng He, the Chinese Muslim Admiral
In 1405, Zheng was chosen to lead the biggest naval expedition in history up to that time.
Ma was thus awarded the supreme command of the Imperial Household Agency and was given the surname Zheng.
Zheng He died in the tenth year of the reign of the Ming emperor Xuande (1433) and was buried in the southern outskirts of Bull's Head Hill (Niushou) in Nanjing.
www.islamfortoday.com /zhenghe.htm   (1258 words)

  
 China commemorates Zheng He
According to some scholars, Zheng is believed to be the first man to blaze a direct sea route linking the Indian Ocean with the West.
Zheng's voyage was 87 years earlier than Columbus' discovery of the Americas and 114 years earlier than Magellan's round-the-world voyage.
This year is the 600th anniversary of Zheng He's first voyage, and the Chinese government has set up a special office to organise a series of activities to mark his contribution to the history of navigation.
www.rin.org.uk /pooled/articles/BF_NEWSART/view.asp?Q=BF_NEWSART_159965   (213 words)

  
 Zheng He
Zheng He, originally named Ma He, was born into a Muslim family just beyond the borders of China (later Yunnan Province in the southwestern part of China) in 1371.
Zheng He's voyages are 87 years earlier than that of Columbus, 93 years earlier than that of Gama, and 116 years earlier than that of Magellan.
The Arabian glass artisan came to China with Zheng He's fleet and imparted the new technology to sinter new kinds of glass vessel resistant to sudden changes of temperature.
www.chinaculture.org /gb/en_aboutchina/2003-09/24/content_22644.htm   (616 words)

  
 USNews.com: Zheng He ran one of the greatest fleets of all time. Did he discover the New World?
Zheng He (pronounced jung huh) was a skilled commander who may have stood nearly 7 feet tall.
Zheng He was one of thousands of Muslims living in a surprisingly diverse China of six centuries ago.
In 1381, when Zheng He was 10 years old, the imperial Army attacked his province, an isolated area on China's lawless southwestern border that was a hideout for outlaws from the ousted Mongol regime.
www.usnews.com /usnews/culture/articles/040223/23zheng.htm   (694 words)

  
 Zheng He
Zheng He was then described as tall and handsome with long earlobes, fierce eyes and skin "rough like the surface of an orange." In fact, he was told to be seven feet tall and six feet wide!
Zheng He's treasure ships used technology that would not be used in Europe for hundreds of years, and were economically much better off than the Europeans.
The monument to Zheng He that was built after his death had become an empty tomb, surrounded with overgrown weeds, its gravestone covered in graffiti in the late 1900's.
www.lakesideschool.org /studentweb/worldhistory/GlobalContactse/ZhengHe.htm   (1030 words)

  
 Zheng He (Cheng Ho)
Zheng He (as modern western historians call him) was born in 1371 A.D in the town of Kunyang in the provence of Yunan.
Zheng He writes, “As soon as this miraculous light appeared the danger was appeased.” The sailors thought it was a sign of protection from a Taoist Goddess and from then on they followed Zheng with additional confidence.
The legendary, Zheng He Most historians agree that Zheng He died in 1433 [36 years before the birth of Vasco da Gama] on the return voyage of the seventh Treasure Fleet.
www.hyperhistory.net /apwh/bios/b3zhenghe.htm   (1666 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | Asia-Pacific | China hails legacy of great adventurer   (Site not responding. Last check: )
While he remains little-known to most people even in his own country, Zheng He is now being turned into a communist hero and held up as the pioneer of the open-door policies that have brought China once again to the brink of being a world power.
Zheng He was born in the poor, mountainous Chinese province of Yunnan in 1372, just as Genghis Khan's Mongols were being overthrown by a new, home-grown dynasty, the Ming.
Zheng Ming is working to raise awareness of the Ming Dynasty voyages, now seen as a model for China's "peaceful rise".
news.bbc.co.uk /2/hi/asia-pacific/4593717.stm   (1058 words)

  
 [No title]
Zheng He's own ship was a technological marvel; by some accounts it was more than 130 m long, almost 60 m wide and sailed under the power of nine masts.
It's about 15 m long, a minnow compared with Zheng He's leviathan, but at least I don't have to share my boat with a full complement of astrologers, navigators, cooks, soldiers (who were brigands working off criminal sentences), hundreds of crew and the odd giraffe that Zheng He brought back for the Emperor.
"Zheng He's one regret," says his descendant, "is that he never reached Mecca." On the last voyage, by the time a few men from his fleet finally made the pilgrimage to Islam's holiest site, Zheng He had died.
coaaweb.org /Zheng-Ho/ship_b.html   (2421 words)

  
 The Seven Voyages of Zheng He - Associated Content
Zheng He’s fourth voyage, beginning in the Fall of 1413, was the most ambitious.
It is not known whether Zheng He took this opportunity to visit Mecca, It is known that his arrival caused such a sensation that envoys from nineteen countries sailed to with him with gifts to the Emperor.
After the death of Zheng He, the great, ocean going ships of the treasure fleet were burned and the construction of ships of more than two masts were forbidden, on pain of death.
www.associatedcontent.com /article/20735/the_seven_voyages_of_zheng_he.html?page=2   (636 words)

  
 English Channel
Zheng He was a eunuch from a family of Hui nationality.
Wherever Zheng He went, he brought gifts and granted titles from the Ming emperor to the local rulers, meaning to establish a broad tribute£­paying circle.
Zheng was more like a good will ambassador than a war ship commander or a boss of a merchant group.
www.cctv.com /english/TouchChina/GloryofChineseCivilization/HistoricalCelebrities/MilitaryLeaders/20021224/100353.html   (536 words)

  
 Perceptive Travel - Admiral Zheng He
As famous as Zheng He is today, probably what is more astounding than anything else about the man and his voyages is that for centuries he had been all but forgotten.
As I at first thought, Zheng He was not chosen by the emperor to carry his daughter and 500 handmaidens aboard his ship because he was a eunuch.
Zheng He's fleets ventured far beyond Southeast Asia, to as far as Aden at the mouth of the Red Sea and then on to the east coast of Africa, stopping at the city-states of Mogadishu and Brawa (in today's Somalia) and Malindi (in present day Kenya).
www.perceptivetravel.com /issues/1205/stephens.html   (1509 words)

  
 China Heritage Newsletter
This tribute to Zheng He, master mariner of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644), is merely one frisson in the flurry of activities organised for the sexcentenary.
Zheng He's voyages should have been the prelude to a dramatic new chapter in Chinese maritime trade and commercial expansion, given their potential to establish or consolidate a desire for Chinese luxury goods such as silks and ceramics in Southeast Asia, South Asia and the Middle East.
Zheng He would undertake a subsequent seventh voyage, but the weight of opinion at court eventually led to the condemnation of state-sponsored expeditions as vainglorious.
www.chinaheritagenewsletter.org /articles.php?searchterm=002_zhenghe.inc&issue=002   (4026 words)

  
 Zheng He Virtual Exhibition
The "Zheng He and Maritime Asia" exhibition is about one of the most amazing chapters in the history of maritime Asia- the seven great voyages between 1405 and 1433 led by a man called Zheng He.
This zone features the various ports-of-call Zheng He visited, the different commodities and currencies that were exchanged between the crew and the local people, and the existing customs and traditions which continue to exist today.
More specifically, it looks at how Zheng He continues to be revered and worshipped in Southeast Asia, the role his voyages played in encouraging Chinese traders to continue seeking fortune in Southeast Asia and the influence he had over the culture and religion of the local communities.
www.elibraryhub.com /zhengHe/about.html   (1262 words)

  
 Admiral Zheng He (1371-1433)
Zheng He (also known as Cheng Ho) was born in what is now Jinning County, Kunming City of Yunnan Province in 1371, the fourth year of the Hongwu reign period (1368-1398) of the Ming Dynasty.
Zheng He was captured by Ming Dynasty forces during their military cleansing of the remnants of the Yuan Dynasty (1279-1368) in Yunnan, around 1381.
Zheng He first conducted an exhaustive study of existing nautical charts, celestial navigation, eastern and western almanacs, astronomy and geography, marine sciences, piloting, and shipbuilding and repair.
www.china.org.cn /english/features/zhenhe/131897.htm   (669 words)

  
 Ming Dynasty:Zheng He and his Voyages
Between 1405 and 1433, Zheng He had, over a period of 28 years, eight times been ordered to act as envoy to countries lying to the west of China.
When he visited Sri Lanka on his third voyage, Zheng He offered a quantity of gold and silver Buddhist ceremonial vessels and silk-knit religious pennants to local temples on whose ground steles were set up to mark the occasion of his visit.
In 1419 when Zheng He was sailing back on his fifth voyage, 17 countries sent their envoys to China, including Philippines and Malaysia.
www.chinavoc.com /history/ming/zh.htm   (1075 words)

  
 The Voyages Of Zheng He - The fleet of the dragon in the Yemeni waters - culture - Yemen Times
Zheng He was a remarkable commander whose voyages of trade exploration and goodwill led to the exchange of knowledge and goods as far a field as Yemen and the east coast of Africa.
Zheng He himself was seven feet tall with a waste five feet in circumference, and a voice as loud as a huge bell.
When Zheng He returned from his seventh voyage in 1433, he was sixty two, and he was heading to the final Place.
yementimes.com /article.shtml?i=874&p=culture&a=1   (2496 words)

  
 Zheng He, - China History Forum, chinese history forum
Zheng He was China's first big ocean trader, presenting gifts from the emperor to leaders in foreign ports and hauling back crabapples, myrrh, mastic gum and even a giraffe.
As the Zheng He anniversary approached, delegations of Chinese diplomats and scholars also traveled to Kenya to investigate the claims that islanders there could trace their roots to sailors on Zheng He's fleet.
Ye Jun, a Beijing historian, said the official contention that Zheng He was a good-will ambassador is a "one-sided interpretation that blindly ignores the objective fact that Zheng He engaged in military suppression" to achieve the emperor's goals.
www.chinahistoryforum.com /index.php?showtopic=5815   (2315 words)

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