Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Aachen Cathedral


Related Topics

In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
 [No title]
Aachen Cathedral UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1978 When King Charlesmagne began work on his palatine chapel in the town now known as Aachen in 786, his dream was to create a “new Rome“.
The heart of Aachen cathedral is Charlesmagne’s former palatinate chapel.
For 600 years, from 936 to 1531, Aachen cathedral was the coronation church for 30 German kings, and even today the cathedral retains much of the glamour of its historic past.
www.unesco-welterbe.de /en/presse/texte/englisch/aachen.doc   (161 words)

  
 Aachen Cathedral - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Aachen Cathedral, frequently referred to as the "Imperial Cathedral" (in German: Kaiserdom) of Aachen, is the oldest cathedral in northern Europe.
The core of the Aachen cathedral is the Palatine Chapel; being surprisingly small in comparison to the later additions, at the time of its construction it was the largest dome north of the Alps.
Its fascinating architecture with Classical, Byzantine and Germanic-Franconian elements is the essence of a monumental building of great importance: for 600 years, from 936 to 1531, the Aachen cathedral was the church of coronation for 30 emperors of the Holy Roman Empire.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aachen_Cathedral   (509 words)

  
 World Equestrian Games Aachen 2006
In the showground, in the city of Aachen, on the television, in the press and naturally on the course.
Aachen City Hall is built upon the eighth century foundations of the residence of Charlemagne.
The cathedral of Aachen, in the heart of the city, is a wonderful work of art.
www.aachen2006.de /WMHindernisse/Hindernisse_e.htm   (870 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Aachen   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
The RWTH Aachen University of Technology (Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule) is one of the major universities for technical studies, especially for mechanical engineering.
During the Middle Ages Aachen was one of the largest cities of the empire.
Aachen is an industrial centre in a coalmining area and a major railway junction, including the Thalys high-speed train network.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Aachen   (544 words)

  
 Aachen, Germany
Aachen (French Aix-la-Chapelle, Dutch Aken) is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, on the border with Belgium and the Netherlands, 65 km to the west of Cologne, and the westernmost city in Germany, at 50°46′ N 6°6′ E.
The RWTH Aachen (Rhine-Westphalian Institute of Technology) is one of the major universities for technical studies, especially for electrical and mechanical engineering.
Aachen is an industrial centre and a major railway junction, including the Thalys high-speed train network.
www.creekin.net /c301-n71-aachen-germany.html   (778 words)

  
 Aachen (Aix-la-Chapelle), Germany
Aachen's importance began to decline in the 16th century, primarily because its location became an inconvenient as the German capital.
Aachen was annexed by France in 1801 and given to Prussia after the Congress of Vienna (1814–15).
The Aachen Cathedral is easily the primary attraction of the city, but there are other sights of interest in Aachen, many of which also relate to Charlemagne and his successors.
www.sacred-destinations.com /germany/aachen.htm   (1212 words)

  
 Aachen Cathedral
The cathedral built around 790 to 800 is historically important building and artifact of universal importance and one of the largest examples of religious architecture.
At Aachen, Charles' favourite residence in the latter part of his long reign (768-814), are preserved memorials of the great man himself and of the empire he founded.
Aachen was one of many estate-centres belonging to the new Carolingian dynasty which had seized power in the Frankish realm in 751.
freepages.family.rootsweb.com /~rgrosser/karolimagni/aachenchapel.htm   (1695 words)

  
 [No title]
The Cathedral of Chartres and the monastery church of CLUNY (Cluny III, 1089-1092) became the envy of bishops and kings, and in the 12th century northern France was grasped by a cathedral construction boom which in the 13th century swept across the border into Aragon, Castile, Leon, England, Germany.
CATHEDRAL SCHOOLS educated the next generation of church architects (which was expected to continue to work on the cathedral); cathedral schools were among the leading educational facilities of their times.
The cathedral is distinguished from a simple parish church by a larger nave, a higher ceiling, supported by pillars and buttresses, and by having two steeples in place of one, and those being the highest in the diocese.
www.zum.de /whkmla/art/hma/cathedrals.html   (655 words)

  
 Aachen Cathedral   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
Aachen Cathedral The Aachen Cathedral, frequently referred to as the "Imperial Cathedral" (in German: Kaiserdom) of Aachen, is the oldest cathedral in northern Europe.
The core of the Aachen Cathedral is the Palace Chapel; being surprisingly small in comparison to the later additions, at the time of its construction it was the largest dome north of the Alps.
Its fascinating architecture with Classical, Byzantine and Germanic-Franconian elements is the essence of a monumental building of great importance: for 600 years, from 936 to 1531, the Aachen Cathedral was the church of coronation for 30 kings of the Holy Roman Empire.
aachen-cathedral.iqnaut.net   (454 words)

  
 Aachen Cathedral - German Historical Heritage
Aachen Cathedral was included into UNESCO World Heritage List in 1978 and got one of the top sites of the list due its unique history enriched by legends and myths and luxurious treasuries kept in the cathedral.
It is said that Charlemagne was born in Aachen, the German Western boundary town (the town borders Belgium and Netherlands), and created the central Northern Europe cultural and politic headquarter at his native place.
The Cathedral was built in the form of octagon with the choir and chapels.
www.germanculture.com.ua /library/weekly/aachen_cathedral.htm   (340 words)

  
 Aachen, Germany
The ancient Imperial City of Aachen (Aix-la-Chapelle) is a Cathedral city and spa in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.
In 1793 and 1794, Aachen was occupied by the French, incorporated with the French Republic in 1798 and 1802, and made the capital of the Department of the Roer.
In World War II, Aachen was the first German city to be taken by the Allies when it was captured by the US 1st Army in October 1944 a large part of the city was destroyed and has since been rebuilt.
www.porttoulouse.com /html/aachen__germany.html   (507 words)

  
 Aachen – Aaken – Aix la Chapelle
The core of the Cathedral is the former Palace Chapel of Charlemagne.
For two thousand years, Aachen's thermal baths with their high level of minerals and trace elements have stimulated and pampered the body and the senses.
The Elisa Fountain (Elisenbrunnen) is the symbol of the spa town of Aachen.
fgmr.chemie.uni-hamburg.de /fg2004/misc/Aachen.htm   (955 words)

  
 Aachen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In 1372, Aachen became the first coin issuing city in the world to regularly place an Anno Domini date on a general circulation coin, a groschen.
RWTH Aachen, established in 1870, is one of the major Institutes of Technology, especially for electrical and mechanical engineering, computer sciences and physics.
Aachen is known in different languages by different names (see also Names of European cities in different languages).
www.higiena-system.com /wiki/link-Aachen   (995 words)

  
 About the City of Aachen
Charlemagne was buried in the [Cathedral of Aachen] in 824.
Aachen's cultural programme covers a wide range and is increasingly appreciated by young and old, among the local population as well as abroad.
Aachen is one of Germany's high tech regions with the largest technical university in Western Europe and many research-oriented companies.
www-i5.informatik.rwth-aachen.de /mjf/stadt-aachen.html   (549 words)

  
 Aachen   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
Aachen sits at the borders of Germany, Belgium, and, the Netherlands, and it is here that Charlemagne is buried.
In fact, it was Charlemagne's idea to build the Kaiserdom (cathedral of the kings) in 805, and it served as the 'coronation church' for 30 of the Holy Roman Emperors, until 1531.
It is the oldest cathedral in Europe, and it has the largest dome north of the Alps.
taylorrhome.dyndns.org /Germany/aachen.htm   (448 words)

  
 Aachen - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Aachen (French Aix-la-Chapelle), city in west central Germany, in North Rhine-Westphalia (Nordrhein-Westfalen), near Belgium and the Netherlands....
The very same month of June, which in 1940 witnessed the supreme triumph of German arms, saw four years later the decisive turn leading to the defeat of Germany and her allies and satellites.
Aix-la-Chapelle, Treaties of, two pacts signed in the city of Aix-la-Chapelle (now Aachen), Germany.
ca.encarta.msn.com /Aachen.html   (100 words)

  
 Aachen and the Euregio   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
Aachen used to have a provincial status, but with a population of about 260.000 inhabitants, a booming high-tech industry and renowned university, it has developed into a mid-sized town with a modern yet historic flair.
Regio Aachen and part of the Dutch province of Limburg, the two Belgian provinces of Limburg and Liège and the German-speaking community of Belgium form the EUREGIO Maas-Rhine.
However, the beauty and uniqueness of the cathedral were not lost on the UNESCO - it is on their list of the world’s most important monuments.
www-zhv.rwth-aachen.de /zentral/english_aachen.html   (490 words)

  
 Catholic Culture : Document Library : The Shrine That Charlemagne Built
Aachen was made the capital of the Empire by Charlemagne and a great part of its lasting fame dates from his reign.
The history of Aachen speaks of great festivities during the crownings of the emperors; of Otto the Great; of Frederick Barbarossa; of the fight against new barbaric invasions from the East during the eighth and ninth centuries which all had their reflection in the court of Aachen.
Though the life of Aachen was immersed in daily excitement, intellectual as well as political, there was one solid edifice built by Charlemagne, the Cathedral which houses the four great relics.
www.catholicculture.org /docs/doc_view.cfm?recnum=2992   (463 words)

  
 Germany - Aachen Cathedral
Aachen is known for its 30 curative mineral springs (the hottest in central Europe) and has been a health resort since the 1st century AD.
During his reign as emperor (800-814), Charlemagne built his palace and cathedral in Aachen, and made the city a center of Carolingian culture, initiating the first great cultural renaissance at the end of the Dark Ages.
During the French Revolution (1789-1799) Aachen was occupied by the French and in 1801 was formally ceded to France.
worldheritage.heindorffhus.dk /frame-GermanyAachen.htm   (710 words)

  
 The World's Great Catholic Churches
This Cathedral is the seat of the Catholic Archbishop of Cologne.
The present cathedral was built to house the relics of the Magi, taken from Milan (Italy) by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Barbarossa and given to the Archbishop of Cologne, Rainald of Dassel in 1164.
The Aachen cathedral treasury displays sacred masterpieces of the late Classical, Carolingian, Ottonian and Staufian period - among them there are some unique exhibits like the "Cross of Lothair" the "Bust of Charlemagne" and the "Persephone sarcophagus".
www.franciscan-sfo.org /fl/kolndom.htm   (2005 words)

  
 Aachen Cathedral - World Heritage Site - Pictures, info and travel reports
Aachen is my favorite German church perhaps becaus the "oktagons" is a copy of the earlier, Byzantine church at Ravena, Italy.
I really liked the architecture of the cathedral it is a real hodgepodge of styles as it was stared in 794 and seemingly added too consistently for the next 1,200 years, the best place to view this is from the Rathaus square (view in the picture).
Of course this cathedral can't be compared to the one in Cologne, but it's definately worth a visit, also maybe in combination with the treasure chambery and of course a guided tour through the cathedral (especially if the cathedral is still hidden).
www.worldheritagesite.org /sites/aachencathedral.html   (1264 words)

  
 Speyer Cathedral - Bavarian Historical and Cultural Heritage
The reasons of such great evaluation were the same comparing with Aachen Cathedral.
The Cathedral was constructed in Speyer, the south-west German town near the French border.
The Cathedral got its high heritage post primarily drawing attention by its architectural particularities: it’s one of the first Romanesque classical examples completed and consecrated in 1061.
www.germanculture.com.ua /library/weekly/speyer_cathedral.htm   (371 words)

  
 World Equestrian Games Aachen 2006
Those who come to Aachen for the horses can enjoy their stay in the old Emperor's City to the fullest.
What awaits them is a city full of charm, a beautiful "Altstadt" with the Aachen Cathedral, the first building to be listed in the World Cultural Inheritance of the UNESCO.
Aachen has an international gaming casino and provides many opportunities to stroll through the streets, wander into the shops, go on a buying spree and, last but not least, dine in one of the vast variety of international restaurants.
www.aachen2006.de /wirInAachen/stadtAachen_e.html   (183 words)

  
 Aachen
Aachen has a big historical background with the history of the emperor Karl and the cathedral of Aachen (builded 1200 years before!) where 30 persons were crownded between 936 until 1531.
The cathedral of Aachen was the first german building which was included in the UNESCO world cultural heritage in 1978.
The sulphureous springs of Aachen were really famous in the last centuries and Aachen was changed to Bad Aachen.
www.planet-interkom.de /isa.hedemann/aachenE.htm   (364 words)

  
 EAPC
Aachen is situated in the border triangle between Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium.
The city of Aachen is historically inspiring and offers at the same time various opportunities for recreation and entertainment.
More than 30 german-roman kings have received their coronation in the Aachen cathedral and historically it has been the most important christian church of pilgrimage.
www.eapcnet.org /Aachen2005/in   (727 words)

  
 aachen congress
Numerous fountains and monuments around the Cathedral and the Town Hall are the symbols of the sparkling variety of Aachen.
The Cathedral and the most important work of art of its treasury which is considered the most important one north of the Alps will be introduced in a competently way to you.
Worth to mention are surely the events of the theatre Aachen and the programme of concerts as well as the cultural events of the city.
www.aachen-congress.de /uk/m05-03.htm   (556 words)

  
 UNESCO World Heritage Aachen
When Emperor Charlemagne began work on his palatine chapel in the town now known as Aachen in 786, his dream was to create a ”new Rome”.
The heart of Aachen cathedral is Charlemagne’s former palatinate chapel.
The single-nave chancel was consecrated on the 600th anniversary of the death of Charlemagne, since when the ”Glass House” of Aachen has impressed generations of visitors with its bold architecture.
www.unesco-welterbe.de /en/staedte/bild_text/aachen.html   (158 words)

  
 Meine Seite   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-05)
Charlemagne had the octagonal cathedral built and it was inaugurated in 805 and it was here that he was buried.
The octagonal cathedral is quite different than the other cathedrals that I have visited in Germany and England because is has strong Byzantine influence as opposed to the typical Gothic architectural style.
Then in the centuries thereafter, they kept adding more parts to the cathedral in whatever style was prevalent at that point in time, so the whole church has a very unusual mixture of architectural styles.
www-users.rwth-aachen.de /tim.bruckhaus/bilder.html   (181 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.