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Topic: Anatta


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  Anatta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Students of Buddhism often encounter an intellectual quandary with the teaching in that the concept of anatta and the doctrine of rebirth seem to be mutually exclusive.
A further difficulty with the anatta doctrine is that it contradicts the notion of a path of practise.
Anatta: Non-Self Audio discussion of Anatta from Buddhist Society of Western Australia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Anatta   (2698 words)

  
 Anatta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
The Buddhist doctrine of Anatta (Pli) or Antman (Sanskrit) specifies the absence of a permament and unchanging self (tman).
Anatta is one of the Three Seals of Buddhist doctrine s and is recorded as having been one of the primary realizations attained by the Buddha during his enlightenment experience.
More innovative solutions include the introduction of a Pudgala, a "person", which functions comparably to the tman in the rebirth process and in karmic agency, but is regarded by its advocates as not falling prey to the metaphysical substantialism of the tman.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Anatta.html   (518 words)

  
 Is Anatta the Central Doctrine of Buddhism
Anatta is the non-self as opposed to the self or atman of Hinduism.
Some called this anatta, but in reality what Buddha taught was that self and non-self are BOTH illusions and that we should take a path which avoids both extremes, away from nihilism on the one hand and from eternalism on the other.
Anatta is stressed in Theravada (the path of elders) or Hinayana (Lesser Vehicle) precisely because that school claims to be ancient and original and thus closest to Hinduism.
www.homeoint.org /morrell/buddhism/anatta.htm   (1402 words)

  
 Myswizard » Anatta
Anatta is one of the Three Seals of Buddhist doctrines and is an important element of wisdom through the apophatic technique used to experience Nirvana, the other two being Dukkha and Anicca.
Specifically in sutra, anatta is used to describe the nature of any and all composite, consubstantial, phenomenal, and temporal things, from the macrocosmic, to microcosmic, be it matter as pertains the physical body or the cosmos at large, including any and all mental machinations which are of the nature of arising and passing.
Anatta/Anatman in the earliest Buddhist texts, the Nikayas, is an adjective, (A is anatta, B is anatta, C is anatta).
www.myswizard.com /2006/04/03/anatta   (2086 words)

  
 Anatta - One Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
The Buddhist doctrine of Anatta (Pāli) or Anātman (Sanskrit) specifies the absence of a permanent and unchanging self (ātman).
Anatta is one of the Three Seals of Buddhist doctrines and is recorded as having been one of the primary realizations attained by the Buddha during his enlightenment experience.
The Buddha clearly states that all five aggregates are impermanent, just as the burning flame is inconstant in one sense, and that knowledge or wisdom is all that remains, just as the only thing constant about a flame is its fuel, or purpose.
www.onelang.com /encyclopedia/index.php/Anatta   (739 words)

  
 Anatta
Anatta (Pali) or Anatma (Sanskrit) is the Buddhist doctrine of the negation of a permanment and unchanging self.
According to Buddhism, all component or conditioned things are impermanent and in a constant state of flux.
Buddhists hold that the notion of a permanent self is one of the main root causes for the wars and conflicts in human history, and that by living by anatta or not-self, we may go beyond our mundane desires.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/an/Anatta.html   (295 words)

  
 Got a Media Request or Concern? Call Anatta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Anatta (her full name), a writer/editor in the group since 1988, is the new media relations specialist.
Anatta's job includes issuing press releases to newspapers and magazines, tracking down experts when reporters call, and coordinating visits for journalists and film crews.
Anatta, Zhenya, and other members of the group, headed by Lucy Warner, are happy to help you with your internal and external communication needs.
www.ucar.edu /communications/staffnotes/9701/media.html   (370 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Anatta
The Buddhist doctrine of Anatta (Pāli) or Anātman (Sanskrit) specifies the absence of a supposedly permanent and unchanging self or soul (ātman).
What is normally thought of as the "self" is in fact an agglomeration of constantly changing physical and mental constituents ("skandhas") which give rise to unhappiness if clung to as though this temporary assemblage formed some kind of immutable and enduring Soul ("atman").
The "anatta" doctrine attempts to encourage the Buddhist practitioner to detach him/herself from this misplaced clinging to what is mistakenly regarded as his or her Self, and from such detachment (aided by moral living and meditation) the way to Nirvana is able successfully to be traversed.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Anatman   (1159 words)

  
 Buddha's World - Anatta (Non-self) and Kamma (Karma)
The other aspect of the teaching which is sometimes seen to be difficult to reconcile or explain, in terms of anatta, is the teaching of kamma or the law of kamma, which is the law of cause and results.
Actually when the Buddha taught the teaching of anatta or non-self, it needed or required the law of kamma, the law of conditionality, and the law of dependent origination to fill in the gap.
The concept of anatta or non-self is of great importance in Buddha's teaching, and it is the one aspect of the teaching which is quite often found by newcomers to Buddhism, or even traditional Buddhists, to be very difficult to understand.
www.katinkahesselink.net /tibet/anatta_jagaro.html   (3582 words)

  
 cyberhobo :: Paper: Anatomy of Schism - Anatta and Rebirth
The anatta doctrine especially provokes division, due mainly to the conflicts that arise when it is examined side-by-side with the doctrine of rebirth.
The necessary reinterpretation of the anatta sermon required by this view explains that the Buddha was only demonstrating that the ‘lesser self,’ represented by the five skandhas, is not the same as the ‘greater self,’ or atman.
The anatta sermon was remembered, and inevitably attempts were made to reconcile it with the doctrine of rebirth.
www.cyberhobo.net /blog?p=438   (2378 words)

  
 Anatta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Anatta means "non-self" in Pali, the scriptural language of Theravada Buddhism (anatman is the Sanskrit equivalent).
What remains as the body of Anatta is some of Ajahn Amaro's breathing and other small, non-speech sounds, the sounds of the others in attendance at the talk and other incidental noises, the room noise, the tape noise, and the audio compression artifacts of the conversion to MP3.
Stripped of the text, and thus of the utility of the recording, we are left with the strange, vibrant beauty underlying—and born of—that utility.
www.uselessobjects.com /anatta   (365 words)

  
 Buddhism and the concept of anatta
It is interesting how Buddhism reconciles itself to a concept like "anatta", without refuting the fact of reincarnation of soul and the evolutionary nature of soul as integral parts of our journey into expanded awareness.
Anicca, Dukha, Anatta: Investigation of Dhamma for full liberation also must include, in addition to the Four Noble Truths, a study of the Three Universal Characteristics or Signata of existence, (ti-lakkhana): anicca — impermanence, dukkha — suffering, and anatta — essencelessness.
Anatta was seized on by nineteenth century Christian missionaries to Sri Lanka as something which proved Buddhism was absolutely nihilistic.
www.hinduwebsite.com /buddhism/anatta.asp   (1587 words)

  
 anatta (1st part)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
It is essential to well understand that the doctrine of anatta, as it is taught and expounded in what we call theraváda, is totally unknown in any other system of thought or exegesis whatsoever, including the modern and so called speculative Buddhism also called mahayána Buddhism.
"anatta" is therefore the conjunction of two particles: the privative particle and the particle designating the idea of "reflexivity", of reciprocity.
Even if, in its wider or deducted meaning, the idea of anatta suggests the absence of an ego, a self or soul, the word anatta in itself doesn't mean "absence of an ego", "absence of a self" or "absence of a soul".
www.dhammadana.org /en/dhamma/3_characteristics/anatta.htm   (5553 words)

  
 Anatta
The Buddhist term Anatman (Sanskrit) or Anatta (Pali) is used both as an adjective, that specifies the absence of a permanent and unchanging self (identity) or soul in any or all of the constituents of empirical existence, and as a noun, that states beyond skandhas, there is no actual self.
Buddhism encourages people to realize the true nature and detached oneself from what is mistakenly regarded as his or her self.
Anatta is one of the Three Seals of all phenomena (khandhas/skandhas) in Buddhist doctrines and is an important element of wisdom through the apophatic technique used for the mind (citta) to experience Nirvana, the other two 'seals' being Dukkha and Anicca.
www.kiwipedia.com /anatta.html   (204 words)

  
 msg buddhism The Buddhist Buddhist doctrine of Anatta or Anmsg...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
msg buddhism The Buddhist Buddhist doctrine of Anatta or Anmsg...
Anatta is one of the Three Seals Three Seals of Buddhist doctrine doctrines and is recorded as having been one of the primary realizations attained by the Buddha Buddha during his enlightenment experience
Buddhist teaching tells us that all in life is impermanent and in a constant state of flux, and that any entity that exists does so only in dependence on the conditions of its arising conditions of its arising, which are non-eternal.
www.biodatabase.de /anatta   (486 words)

  
 No-self or Not-self?
To understand what his silence on this question says about the meaning of anatta, we first have to look at his teachings on how questions should be asked and answered, and how to interpret his answers.
The Buddha divided all questions into four classes: those that deserve a categorical (straight yes or no) answer; those that deserve an analytical answer, defining and qualifying the terms of the question; those that deserve a counter-question, putting the ball back in the questioner's court; and those that deserve to be put aside.
In this sense, the anatta teaching is not a doctrine of no-self, but a not-self strategy for shedding suffering by letting go of its cause, leading to the highest, undying happiness.
www.accesstoinsight.org /lib/modern/thanissaro/notself2.html   (986 words)

  
 Anatta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
The Buddhist doctrine of Anatta (Pāli) or Anātman (Sanskrit) specifies the absence ofa permament and unchanging self (ātman).
Students of Buddhism often encounter an intellectual quandary with the teaching in that the concept of anatta and the doctrineof rebirth seem to be mutually exclusive.
More innovative solutionsinclude the introduction of a Pudgala, a"person", which functions comparably to the ātman in the rebirth process and in karmic agency, but is regarded by its advocates as not falling prey to the metaphysical substantialism of theātman.
www.therfcc.org /anatta-1671.html   (501 words)

  
 BuddhaNet Magazine Article: Anatta and Meditation - Chris Kang
Anatta often translated in English as ‘non-self’ or ‘egolessness’, is regarded by both Buddhist practitioners and scholars alike as being the essential kernel of the vast edifice of Buddhist thought and practice.
In particular, Buddhist meditators have often described anatta as the single most profound discovery of the Buddha, and that an insight into anatta is crucial for attaining that utter liberation of the mind which is the summum bonum of Buddhist praxis.
While this may be a glimpse of anatta, albeit an imperfect and distorted one, it never had the significance and clarity that the second experience had.
www.buddhanet.net /anattamed.htm   (3787 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Anatta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Thoughts Without a Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective (1995, BasicBooks, ISBN 0465039316) is a book by Mark Epstein, and it deals with the conception or image we have of ourselves — In other words, who we think we are.
The non-doctrinal commentarial "anatta" doctrine attempts to encourage the Buddhist practitioner to detach him/herself from this misplaced clinging to what is mistakenly regarded as his or her Self, and from such detachment (aided by moral living and meditation) the way to Nirvana is able successfully to be traversed.
Anatta in sutra is synonymous and interchangeable with the terms dukkha (suffering) and anicca (impermanent), and all three terms are often used in triplet in making a blanket statement as regards any and all phenomena.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Anatta   (3165 words)

  
 The Doctrine of Anatta
To the ordinary level of knowledge and thinking the Anatta dhamma may appear as a metaphysical concept, but it is the only practical realistic truth in life.
Thus the Anatta truth arises from the nature of life, Anicca dhamma, the impermanence of all phenomena.
Anatta, in brief, shows us that there are no "I" and "you" who like or dislike "things" and "persons".
web.ukonline.co.uk /buddhism/hanhtay3.htm   (1153 words)

  
 Under the Tree - Philosophy - The Buddhist Paradox Essay by Greg Stone
Apparently the anatta doctrine is false and misleading.
As the anatta doctrine teaches, this soul identity is a false self which must be discarded if one is to achieve a cessation of suffering and reach the state of nirvana.
This is not the end of the path." He might have admonished them to continue past the false self that is the soul wrapped in the aggregates, on to the realm of the immaterial and formless, the realm of the pure consciousness, on to nirvana.
visitunderthetree.com /philosophy/buddhistParadox.html   (2981 words)

  
 Atman (Buddhism) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
As contrasted to the 5-aggregates, which are anatman (Pali: anatta), are not the Soul, are “na me so atta” (are not my Self).
For anatta is not said of the Self but what it is not.
With the doctrine of anatta (Pāli; Sanskrit: anātman) Buddhism maintains that the concept of ātman is unnecessary and counterproductive as an explanatory device for analyzing action, causality, karma, and reincarnation in a Buddhist context.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Atman_(Buddhism)   (1648 words)

  
 Hexapedia - Anatta (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab2.isi.jhu.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Summary Buddhist teaching tells us that all in life is impermanent and in a constant state of flux, and that any entity that exists does so only in dependence on the conditions of its arising, which are non-eternal.
Interpretive problems Students of Buddhism often encounter an intellectual quandary with the teaching in that the concept of anatta and the doctrine of rebirth seem to be mutually exclusive.
No Inner Core: An Introduction to the Doctrine of Anatta by Sayadaw U Silananda (PDF file).
www.hexafind.com.cob-web.org:8888 /encyclopedia/Anatta   (724 words)

  
 anatta1
Anatta is a Pali word consisting of a negative prefix, ‘an’ meaning not, plus atta, soul, and is most literally translated as no-soul.
In The Truth of Anatta, Dc G.P Malalasekera states that atta is “self, as a subtle metaphysical entity soul.”’ These definitions also cover a wide range of meanings of the term atta and of the usual translations of atra as soul and self.
This is because the doctrine of anatta was taught by the Buddha from the point of view of the Fully Enlightened One, a view which saw that all things are anatta.
www.geocities.com /ekchew.geo/anatta1.html   (1804 words)

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