Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Antimony


  
  United States Antimony Corporation, producer of high quality antimony and natural zeolite products.
United States Antimony Corporation, producer of high quality antimony and natural zeolite products.
The main antimony operation is located in Thompson Falls, Montana where USAC mined the metal underground for 15 years beginning in 1969.
Deposit reserves are estimated to exceed 200,000,000 tons.
www.usantimony.com   (375 words)

  
  Antimony - LoveToKnow 1911
Antimony and its salts may be readily detected by the orange precipitate of antimony sulphide which is produced when sulphuretted hydrogen is passed through their acid solutions, and also by the Marsh test (see Arsenic); in this latter case the fl stain produced is not soluble in bleaching powder solution.
Antimony trichloride ("Butter of Antimony"), SbCl 31 is obtained by burning the metal in chlorine; by distilling antimony with excess of mercuric chloride; and by fractional distillation of antimony tetroxide or trisulphide in hydrochloric acid solution.
Antimony trifluoride, SbF 3, is obtained by dissolving the trioxide in aqueous hydrofluoric acid or by distilling antimony with mercuric fluoride.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Antimony   (3125 words)

  
  Antimony - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Antimony is used in flame-proofing, paints, ceramics, enamels, a wide variety of alloys, electronics, and rubber.
Antimony in its elemental form is a silvery white, brittle, fusible, crystalline solid that exhibits poor electrical and heat conductivity properties and vaporizes at low temperatures.
Antimony is geochemically categorized as a chalcophile, occurring with sulfur and the heavy metals lead, copper, and silver.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Antimony   (1084 words)

  
 ATSDR - ToxFAQs™: Antimony and Compounds
Antimony is a silvery-white metal that is found in the earth's crust.
Antimony ores are mined and then mixed with other metals to form antimony alloys or combined with oxygen to form antimony oxide.
Antimony isn't used alone because it breaks easily, but when mixed into alloys, it is used in lead storage batteries, solder, sheet and pipe metal, bearings, castings, and pewter.
www.atsdr.cdc.gov /tfacts23.html   (956 words)

  
 Antimony - MSN Encarta
The atomic number of antimony is 51; the element is in group 15 (or Va) of the periodic table (see Periodic Law).
The principal ore of antimony is stibnite, a sulfide of antimony, which is mined in China, France, Italy, Japan, Mexico, and, on a small scale, in the western United States.
Liquid antimony has the exceptional property, when cooling, of expanding as it solidifies (water is one of the few other substances with this same property).
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761554420/Antimony.html   (332 words)

  
 Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Antimony   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antimony should not be confused with antinomy, a type of paradox.
Antimony is chalcophile, occurring with sulfur and the heavy metals lead, copper, and silver.
The origin of the name "antimony" is not clear; the term may come from the Greek words "anti" and "monos", which approximately means "opposed to solitude" as it was thought never to exist in its pure form, or from the Arabian expression "Antos Ammon", which could be translated as "bloom of the god Ammon".
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Antimony   (723 words)

  
 C&EN: IT'S ELEMENTAL: THE PERIODIC TABLE - ANTIMONY
In addition, antimony is part of the canon of homeopathy and has been widely applied in the past few centuries.
The antimony resistance of some strains of the leishmaniasis parasite is possibly caused by the inability of these cells to effect the reduction, thereby interrupting the chemical reactions.
Antimony was recognized in compounds by ancient civilizations and was known as a metal at the beginning of the 17th century.
pubs.acs.org /cen/80th/antimony.html   (848 words)

  
 antimony. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
The pure element antimony is produced from the ore by roasting it to form the oxide, then reducing the oxide with carbon or iron; often a flux of sodium sulfate or sodium carbonate is used to prevent loss of molten antimony by evaporation.
Antimony does not react with air or water at room temperature; it does react with fluorine, chlorine, or bromine and is soluble in hot nitric or sulfuric acid; at higher temperatures, antimony will ignite and burn in air.
Although antimony and many of its compounds are toxic, tartar emetic (potassium antimonyl tartrate) is used as a medicine.
www.bartleby.com /65/an/antimony.html   (409 words)

  
 Antimony trioxide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Antimony trioxide is an amphoteric oxide, dissolving in alkaline solution to give antimonites and in acid solution to given a range of polyantimonous acids.
Antimony trioxide is only weakly absorbed by the digestive system, and the main route of exposure is by inhalation of the dust.
Antimony trioxide is known to pass into breast milk and to transverse the placenta.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Antimony_trioxide   (290 words)

  
 antimony - The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition - HighBeam Research   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antimony exists in two allotropic forms (see allotropy); the more common is silvery blue-white and has a rhombohedral crystalline structure.
The pure element antimony is produced from the ore by roasting it to form the oxide, then reducing the oxide with carbon or iron; often a flux of sodium sulfate or sodium carbonate is used to prevent loss of molten antimony by evaporation.
Antimony does not react with air or water at room temperature; it does react with fluorine, chlorine, or bromine and is soluble in hot nitric or sulfuric acid; at higher temperatures, antimony will ignite and burn in air.
www.highbeam.com /doc/1E1:antimony/antimony.html?refid=ip_hf   (390 words)

  
 Antimony (Sb)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antimony is a bluish-white, semimetallic element ranking 64th in natural abundance among the elements in crustal rock.
Antimony's principal ore is stibnite which is mined in China, France, Italy, Japan, Mexico and, on a small scale, in the western United States.
Antimony compounds (oxides, sulfides, sodium antimonate and antimony trichloride) are used in manufacturing flame-proofing compounds, paints, ceramic glazes, glass and pottery.
www.bayerus.com /msms/fun/pages/periodic/antimony/index.html   (152 words)

  
 Antimony
Antimony is a hard, brittle, silver-white metal with a relatively high specific gravity (6.69) and a relatively low melting temperature.
Antimony compounds are used in medicines, the rubber and patent-leather industries, paint pigments, enamelware glazes, and as fire-proof coatings on clothing.
Antimony was mined intermittently in Arkansas after its discovery in 1873.
www.state.ar.us /agc/antimony.htm   (419 words)

  
 Antimony (Sb) - Chemical properties, Health and Environmental effects
Antimony si a semimetallic chemical element which can exist in two forms: the metallic form is bright, silvery, hard and brittle; the non metallic form is a grey powder.
Antimony is a poor conductor of heat and electricity, it is stable in dry air and is not attacked by dilute acids or alkalis.
Antimony is used as a medine for parasital infections, but people who have had too much of the medicine or were sensitive to it have experienced health effects in the past.
www.lenntech.com /Periodic-chart-elements/Sb-en.htm   (582 words)

  
 Antimony
Antimony in its elemental form is a silvery white, brittle, fusible, crystalline solid that exhibits poor electrical and heat conductivity properties and vaporizes at low temperatures.
Antimony is geochemically categorized as a chalcophile, occurring with sulfur and the heavy metals lead, copper, and silver.
Antimony was recognized in antiquity (3000 BC or earlier) in various compounds, and it was prized for its fine casting qualities.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http%3A%2F%2Farticles.gourt.com%2F%3Farticle%3DAntimony%26type%3Den   (1009 words)

  
 Todini and Co s.p.a. | Chemical products based on antimony
Antimony has many uses: as an anti-emetic in the pharmaceutical industry, in the textile industry, in the production of enamels and paints, in the explosive and military industry.
Antimony trioxide is a crystalline powder, white when cold, yellow when hot; it is insoluble in water and in nitric acid, somewhat soluble in diluted H2S04 and HCI; however, it becomes more soluble in these acid concentrates.
Also known as antimonious oxide, antimony oxide, antimony sesquioxide, and antimony snow, antimony trioxide is used in the chemical industry for the preparation of sodium antimoniate.
www.todiniandco.com /products/antimony/index.html   (289 words)

  
 WHO | Antimony in drinking-water
At present, abrasion of antimony (and other metals) from brakes, tires and street surfaces as well as emission of aerosolic antimony in vehicle exhaust are the main sources of antimony in urban fine dust (Stechmann, 1993).
Antimony is not likely to occur at significantly higher concentrations in natural waters, except in those areas affected by acid mine drainage.
Antimony at one time was considered as a possible replacement for lead in solders, but there is no evidence of any significant contribution to drinking-water concentrations from this source.
www.who.int /water_sanitation_health/dwq/chemicals/0304_74/en/index5.html   (376 words)

  
 Antimony (UK PID)
Antimony trioxide is used as a flame retardant in textiles, as a catalyst, and as an opacifier in glass, enamels and ceramics.
Antimony trisulphide is used in fireworks, matches, as a pigment, and in the manufacture of ruby glass.
Inhalation Pulmonary toxicity Dusts and fumes of antimony and its compounds are irritant to the respiratory tract and mucous membranes and inhalation causes conjunctivitis, laryngitis, pharyngitis, tracheitis, rhinitis and bronchitis (Renes, 1953; Taylor, 1966).
www.intox.org /databank/documents/chemical/antimony/ukpid40.htm   (4258 words)

  
 antimony   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antimony is toxic, and many of its compounds are to.
Antimony was found by the ancients in a compound, and was known as a metal in the begging of the 17th century.
Most of the history of Antimony was only known to the ancients.
www.mvschools.org /ms/projects/html/brick/antimony.htm   (133 words)

  
 Antimony   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antimony, Sb, is a metallic main group element, found in Group Vb of the periodic table.
Antimony Black is the highly divided powdered form of the metal which is used to coat brass and lead alloys.
Antimony is detected by the orange coloured precipitate that is formed when Hydrogen Sulphide, H2S, is passed into an acidified solution of the substance under test.
www.ucc.ie /ucc/depts/chem/dolchem/html/elem/elem051.html   (369 words)

  
 CRB Fundamentals
Antimony is a lustrous, extremely brittle and hard crystalline semi-mental that is silvery white in its most common allotropic form.
Antimony is primarily a byproduct of the mining, smelting and refining of lead, silver, and copper ores.
The most common use of antimony is in antimony trioxide, a chemical that is used as a flame retardant in textiles, plastics, adhesives and building materials.
www.crbtrader.com /fund/articles/antimony.asp   (424 words)

  
 Antimony in alchemy
Antimony compounds especially the trisulphide were used in antiquity, for example Kohl (al-koh'l of the Arabs), used to stain the eyelids.
Saffron of antimony = Golden sulphide of antimony, or Golden sulphuret of antimony, the pentasulphide of antimony, which is of a golden or orange yellow powder.
It is a compound of antimony trioxide and trisulphide.
www.levity.com /alchemy/antimony_in_alchemy.html   (575 words)

  
 Jumpgate - Database:Commodities:Antimony   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Antimony generally shows the properties of a metal, but sometimes shows those of a nonmetal.
Liquid antimony has the exceptional property, when cooling, of expanding as it solidifies.
Antimony is used widely as a medicinal agent, in vulcanizing rubber, as a yellow pigment in glass and porcelain, and for bronzing steel.
www.jossh.com /database/commodities/antimony.html   (51 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.