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Topic: Neuron


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
  Neuroscience For Kids - cells of the nervous system
One way to classify neurons is by the number of extensions that extend from the neuron's cell body (soma).
Neurons are the oldest and longest cells in the body!
Neurons can be quite large - in some neurons, such as corticospinal neurons (from motor cortex to spinal cord) or primary afferent neurons (neurons that extend from the skin into the spinal cord and up to the brain stem), can be several feet long!
faculty.washington.edu /chudler/cells.html   (681 words)

  
  Neuromedia - Our articles - Brain - How does the neuron function?
The neuron is different from the other cells in its capacity to generate an electric signal that is called a nervous impulse.
Neurons are separated from their environments by a fine layer (a few thousandths of a millimetre thick) called the cell membrane.
The nervous impulse is transmitted to another neuron or another type of cell (for example a muscular cell) via the synapse (the contact between one neuron and the next).
www.neuromedia.ca /en/nos_articles/cerveau7.asp   (764 words)

  
 neuron
Neurons consist of a cell body which contains the nucleus of the cell, most of the cytoplasm and two different kinds of cell processes.
Typical neurons have several dendrites - branching processes that conduct impulses toward the cell body, and a single axon - a long straight process that conducts impulses away from the cell body.
A synapse is where the branched end of an axon, the telodendron, transmits its impulse to another neuron or an effector organ such as a muscle cell across the tiny synaptic space.
www.ndsu.nodak.edu /instruct/tcolvill/135/neuron.htm   (334 words)

  
 The Life and Death of a Neuron: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Glia outnumber neurons by a substantial amount -- some scientists have estimated it to be as large as nine to one -- but in spite of their smaller numbers, neurons are the key players in the brain.
Glia outnumber neurons by a substantial amount == some scientists have estimated it to be as large as nine to one == but in spite of their smaller numbers, neurons are the key players in the brain.
Neurons are born in areas of the brain that are rich in concentrations of neural precursor cells (also called neural stem cells).
www.ninds.nih.gov /disorders/brain_basics/ninds_neuron.htm   (2191 words)

  
 neuron - Search Results - MSN Encarta
There are two main types of brain cells: neurons and neuroglia.
Neurons are responsible for the transmission and analysis of all electrochemical...
Biological neurons have a fairly simple large-scale structure, although their operation and small-scale structure is immensely complex.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/search.aspx?q=neuron   (118 words)

  
 Neuron definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms easily defined on MedTerms
Neuron: A nerve cell that sends and receives electrical signals over long distances within the body.
A neuron may send electrical output signals to muscle neurons (called motor neurons or motoneurons) and to other neurons.
The word "neuron" comes straight from the Greek meaning "a sinew, tendon, thong, string, or wire." The term was introduced to designate a nerve cell by the English physiologist Sir Charles Scott Sherrington (1857-1952).
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=7785   (236 words)

  
 What is NEURON?
NEURON programming is done with hoc, an interpreted language with C-like syntax (Kernighan and Pike, 1984) that has been extended to include functions specific to the domain of modeling neurons, implementing a graphical interface, and object-oriented programming.
One day courses on NEURON are presented as a satellite to the annual meetings of the Society for Neuroscience, and intensive five day hands-on summer courses are given at the University of California in San Diego and other locations; for announcements of future courses see http://www.neuron.yale.edu/neuron/courses.html.
NEURON is distributed free of charge from http://www.neuron.yale.edu/.
www.neuron.yale.edu /neuron/about/what.html   (2405 words)

  
  Neuron - Psychology Wiki - a Wikia wiki
Neurons are typically composed of a soma, or cell body, a dendritic tree and an axon.
Neurons communicate with one another via synapses, where the axon terminal of one cell impinges upon a dendrite or soma of another (or less commonly to an axon).
Neurons such as Purkinje cells in the cerebellum can have over 1000 dendritic branches, making connections with tens of thousands of other cells; other neurons, such as the magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus, have only one or two dendrites, each of which receives thousands of synapses.
psychology.wikia.com /wiki/Neurons   (2637 words)

  
  Neuron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The concept of a neuron as the primary computational unit of the nervous system was devised by the Spanish anatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal in the early 20th century.
Neurons communicate with one another via synapses, where the axon terminal of one cell impinges upon a dendrite or soma of another (or less commonly to an axon).
Neurons such as Purkinje cells in the cerebellum can have over 1000 dendritic branches, making connections with tens of thousands of other cells; other neurons, such as the magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus, have only one or two dendrites, each of which receives thousands of synapses.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Neuron   (1790 words)

  
 Neuron - Dic.blogopt.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Neurons (also spelled neurones or called nerve cells) are the primary cells of the nervous system.
Neurons communicate with one another and to other cells through synapses, where the axon tip of one cell impinges upon a dendrite or soma of another, or less commonly to an axon.
Neurons of the cortex in mammals, such as the Purkinje cells, can have over 1000 dendrites each, enabling connections with tens of thousands of other cells.
dic.blogopt.com /Neuron   (787 words)

  
 Artificial neuron
The artificial neuron is another name for the Threshold Logic Unit originally proposed by Warren McCulloch and Walter Pitts in 1940.
It receives one or more inputs and produces an output based on the calculation of the sum of the inputs using a simple non-linear function as a threshold or step function which is usually a sigmoid.
The artificial neurons are highly interconnected in a large single-layer or multi-layer neural network, the information processing performed in this way may be crudely summarised as follows: signals (action-potentials) appear at the unit's inputs (synapse s).
www.nebulasearch.com /encyclopedia/article/Artificial_neuron.html   (288 words)

  
 Neuron | Macmillan Animal Sciences
Dendrites are an extension of the neuronal membrane.
If a neuron were disconnected from all other neurons, its membrane potential would remain constant, but when a neuron is in contact with other neurons, it receives many depolarizing signals at its dendrites.
The neuron that releases the neurotransmitter from its axon is called the presynaptic cell and the neuron that receives the neurotransmitter at its dendrites is called the postsynaptic cell.
www.bookrags.com /research/neuron-ansc-03   (910 words)

  
 The Mind Project: The McCulloch & Pitts Neuron   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Suppose there is a neuron in a bird's brain that has two receivers, which are connected somehow to the bird's eyes.
Since we want the neuron to instruct the bird to eat blueberries but not golfball, violets or hotdogs we need a threshold high enough so that it requires that both of the two properties are present.
The MCP neuron is presently set with a threshold of 2, as described in the paragraph above.
www.mind.ilstu.edu /curriculum/perception/mpneuron1.html   (1483 words)

  
 The Neuron
Although in some neurons, it is hard to distinguish from the dendrites, in others it is easily distinguished by its length.
There are more specialized neurons in the nose and tongue that are sensitive to the molecular shapes we perceive as tastes and smells.
Motor neurons are able to stimulate muscle cells throughout the body, including the muscles of the heart, diaphragm, intestines, bladder, and glands.
webspace.ship.edu /cgboer/theneuron.html   (905 words)

  
 Dassault Neuron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Dassault Neuron - sometimes written as nEUROn - is a French delta attack UCAV unmanned attack aircraft demonstrator currently under development by Dassault Aviation in collaboration with Swedish SAAB (claim 25% of development), Greece Hellenic_Aerospace_Industry, Italy (ALENIA), Spain (EADS-CASA) and Switzerland (RUAG).
As a UCAV (Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle) Neuron will be significantly larger and more advanced than other well-known UAV systems like the RQ-1 Predator, with ranges, payloads and capabilities that begin to approach manned fighter aircraft.
Although the project is not yet closely defined, illustrations and statements by the consortium partners indicate that the Neuron is envisoned as a competitive system with the American J-UCAS program's Boeing X-45C or Northrop-Grumman X-47B.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dassault_Neuron   (1005 words)

  
 The Neuron
Although in some neurons, it is hard to distinguish from the dendrites, in others it is easily distinguished by its length.
There are more specialized neurons in the nose and tongue that are sensitive to the molecular shapes we perceive as tastes and smells.
Motor neurons are able to stimulate muscle cells throughout the body, including the muscles of the heart, diaphragm, intestines, bladder, and glands.
www.ship.edu /~cgboeree/theneuron.html   (905 words)

  
 Neuron Summary
Neurons are nerve cells (neurocytes), which, together with neuroglial cells, comprise the nervous tissue making up the nervous system.
Neurons are sometimes called nerve cells, though this term is technically imprecise, as many neurons do not form nerves.
In vertebrates, neurons are found in the brain, the spinal cord and in the...
www.bookrags.com /Neuron   (465 words)

  
 Neuron Basics
The neuron is the cell that animals use to detect the outside environment, the internal environment of their own bodies, to formulate behavioral responses to those signals, and to control their bodies based on the chosen responses.
When a neuron sends an excitatory signal to another neuron, then this signal will be added to all of the other inputs of that neuron.
When the neurotransmitters from other firing neurons come in contact with their corresponding receptors on the dendrites of the target neuron it causes those receptors to open or close some of the passive ion transports.
www.mindcreators.com /NeuronBasics.htm   (1079 words)

  
 BBSPrints Archive: A neuron doctrine in the philosophy of neuroscience.
A neuron doctrine in the philosophy of neuroscience.
One version, the trivial neuron doctrine, turns out to be uncontroversial but unsubstantive because it fails to have the consequence that the non-neuroscientific sciences of the mind will eventually be discarded.
We argue that the neuron doctrine appears to be both substantive and uncontroversial only as a result of a conflation of these two versions.
www.bbsonline.org /documents/a/00/00/05/53/index.html   (543 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Neuron
The axon of a human motoneuron can be over a metre long, reaching from the base of the spine to the toes, while girraffes have single axons running along the whole length of its neck, which is several feet.
the neurons being affected by the neurotransmitter) an electrical stimulation (an electrical excitation) which will spread to the axon hillock generating an action potential which then travels as a wave of electrical excitation along the axon.
Another less common form of communication between neurons is through electrical synapses mediated by gap junctions.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Neuron   (828 words)

  
 SparkNotes: The Neuron: Structure of the Neuron
Neurons in the human brain vary widely in their size and shape.
A neuron consists of a cell body, called the soma, with arms that reach out to connect to the network of other neurons in the brain.
Each signal travels along the neuron's axon to the terminal bouton, where it is then transmitted to the next neuron.
www.sparknotes.com /psychology/neuro/neuron/section2.rhtml   (467 words)

  
 A Brief Introduction to the Brain:Neuron1
By means of its terminals one neuron transmits information about its own activity to the receiving structures (mainly dendrites) of other neurons.This transmission is achieved by releasing in the terminal a specific chemical signal: the neurotransmitter.
Normally a presinaptic neuron terminates at the postsynaptic neuron´s dendrites but communication may take place at the cell body, or even, although less often, at the initial or terminal portions of the axon.
Neurons display an unambiguous polarity in the direction of information flow: Information flows from the receiving sites of the neuron (mainly dendrites and cell body) to the trigger zone at the axon hillock.
ifcsun1.ifisiol.unam.mx /Brain/neuron.htm   (657 words)

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