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Topic: Phonetic alphabet


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In the News (Thu 18 Jul 19)

  
  Phonetic alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A type of phonetic notation used for transcribing the sounds of human speech into writing.
Relatedly, a writing system that deals with phonemes is likely to be called a phonetic alphabet, although the term phonemic alphabet might be used instead.
The term phonetic, though common, is a misnomer in this context, as the purpose of such alphabets is to identify spelling rather than pronunciation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Phonetic_alphabet   (249 words)

  
 NATO phonetic alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This phonetic alphabet differs from the linguistics term phonetic alphabet, which refers to a set of symbols which describe the pronunciation of words.
To identify the deficiencies of the new alphabet, testing was conducted among speakers from 31 nations, principally by the governments of the United Kingdom and the United States.
The NATO phonetic alphabet is referred to repeatedly in Robert Ludlum's novel The Bourne Identity.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/NATO_phonetic_alphabet   (2558 words)

  
 Phonetic Alphabets (30-Nov-1996)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Phonetic alphabets can be used to reduce between-letter confusability and improve performance for both human-human and computer-human communication.
As a result of this background all are familiar with the "military" phonetic alphabet and use it reasonably consistently.
The one such alphabet we collected was similar to published police alphabets and appears to be distinguished primarily by the greater use of personal names.
www.speech.cs.cmu.edu /rspeech-1/air/projects/cruiser/alphabets.html   (438 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet - Psychology Central   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language.
It is intended as a notational standard for the phonemic and phonetic representation of all spoken languages.
The letters chosen for the IPA are generally drawn from the Latin and Greek alphabets, or are modifications of Latin or Greek letters.
www.psychcentral.com /psypsych/International_Phonetic_Alphabet   (4571 words)

  
 ALPHABET
It is proposed that the alphabet originated in an intellectual sequence similar to that followed by Alexander Bell and Henry Sweet in constructing their Visible and Organic Alphabets.The originator of the alphabet used the same kind of introspective analysis of his own speech sounds and of the manner in which they were articulated.
What made the alphabet ultimately successful was the selection of the forms of the characters and the limitation of the number of distinct sounds which the characters represented (omitting all the refinements of vowel and consonantal sounds which modern phonetics has identified).
As the forms of the alphabet settled down and as any awareness of articulatory origin of the characters was lost, the alignment of the letter was systematised and perhaps in some cases adjusted to increase the distinctiveness of the characters, for example, between Greek lambda and gamma.
www.percepp.demon.co.uk /alphabet.htm   (8536 words)

  
 Ham Radio DX Phonetics
The NATO phonetic alphabet was developed in the 1950s to be intelligible (and pronounceable) to all NATO allies.
It is sometimes inappropriately referred to as International Phonetic Alphabet, which is actually the official name of an alphabet used in linguistics created in the late nineteenth century.
The NATO phonetic alphabet is now widely used in business and telecommunications in Europe and North America, and has been approved by ICAO for use in international civil aviation.
www.ac6v.com /dxphonetics.htm   (426 words)

  
 ITU PHONETICS
The use of ITU phonetics in both tactical and formal message (record) traffic handling is essential for accurate and efficient communications.
Use of standard ITU phonetics is crucial under conditions of weak or poor propagation or interference.
If non-standard phonetics are used, it may confuse the receiving operator and delay the traffic.
www.emcomm.org /svares/training/itu_phonetics_10_30_2001.htm   (415 words)

  
 Phonetic alphabet - International Phonetic Alphabet - Factbites
The most commonly used phonetic alphabet today is that adopted by NATO in The spelling used for the alphabet here and the phonetics for digits are as
A phonetic alphabet is a list of words used to identify letters in a An early version of the phonetic alphabet appears in the 1913 edition of The
The International Phonetic Alphabet Braille Code (updated November 1990), by the Royal National Institute for the Blind in London.
webinfofeed.com /wifd/phonetic-alphabet.htm   (410 words)

  
 Phoenetic Alphabet
A phonetic alphabet is a list of words used to identify letters in a message transmitted by radio or telephone.
Both the meanings of the flags (the letter which they represent) and their names (which make up the phonetic alphabet) were selected by international agreement.
The current phonetic alphabet was adopted in 1957.
www.history.navy.mil /faqs/faq101-1.htm   (280 words)

  
 Phonetic Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Phonetic Alphabet is used to spell out letters in place of just saying the letter itself.
The phonetic alphabet is used primarily used in two-way radio communications.
This alphabet is recognized by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), International Telecommunication Union (ITU), and NATO as the standard for aircraft communications and radio communications.
www.grc.nasa.gov /WWW/MAEL/ag/phonetic.htm   (296 words)

  
 The Evolution of the Alphabet
Most evidence suggests that the invention of the Alphabet occurred in Byblos, the city famous for its trade in papyrus, presumably as a result of the work of the workmen and merchants of Byblos who had a long history of commerce with Egypt.
The three signs are still used for the numbers 6, 900, and 90 in the scheme of writing numbers by means of the letters of the alphabet.
From the Greeks the alphabet passed on to the Etruscans of Italy; to the Copts of Egypt (where it replaced their old Egyptian hieroglyphic writing); and to the Slavonic peoples of Eastern Europe.
www.geocities.com /CapitolHill/Parliament/2587/alpha.html   (1048 words)

  
 138: Phonetic Alphabets
Phonetic alphabets are designed (and necessary) for writing down utterances in a way that records how they sounded.
The reader of a phonetic transcription facing a given symbol could never be sure of what sound it was intended to represent.
The only proposed alphabet which has achieved widespread use is the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), used by phoneticians, linguists, speech/language pathologists, and increasingly by dictionary makers and second language teachers.
www.umanitoba.ca /faculties/arts/linguistics/russell/138/sec1/ipa1.htm   (900 words)

  
 Phonetic Alphabet Recommended by the ITU   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
While many Veterans in the group will recognize this as the "Military Phonetic Alphabet", it was originally issued by the International Civil Aviation Organization, the United Nations specialized agency that coordinates aviation standards around the world.
This phonetic alphabet has also been adopted by another UN specialized agency, the International Telecommunications Union, which sets standards (called Reccommendations) for telephone and radio communications around the world.
Phonetics are wonderful for spelling out words over telephone circuits where it's easy to mistake an F for an S, among other things.
spaceyideas.com /ozzie/phonalph.html   (190 words)

  
 Benjamin Franklin's Phonetic Alphabet
The alphabet was published in 1779 in Franklin's Political, Miscel­laneous, and Philosophical Pieces.
His new phonetic alphabet consisted all the lowercase letters of the Latin alphabet, minus c, j, q, w, x, and y, which he thought redundant, plus six new letters for sounds which he thought lacked unambiguous orthographic representation.
Consonant combinations are used to represent such sounds as the ch in chew and the j in jaw.
www.omniglot.com /writing/franklin.htm   (225 words)

  
 phonetic alphabet, military police alphabet
The phonetic language is used by professional communicators, especially police, military and other emergency and armed forces, to identify letters precisely, either when communicating initials, abbreviations or spellings of words.
The phonetic alphabet is a useful reference for language and communications study and training.
Different variations of the phonetic langauge exist - this one seems to be the original and still most widely used.
www.businessballs.com /phoneticalphabet.htm   (219 words)

  
 Handbook of the International Phonetic Association - Cambridge University Press
This book is a comprehensive guide to the International Phonetic Alphabet, whose aim is to provide a universally agreed system of notation for the sounds of languages, and which has been widely used for over a century.
The Handbook presents the basics of phonetic analysis so that the principles underlying the Alphabet can be readily understood, and gives examples of the use of each of the phonetic symbols.
The application of the Alphabet is then demonstrated in nearly 30 ‘Illustrations’ - concise analyses of the sound systems of a range of languages, each of them accompanied by a phonetic transcription of a passage of speech.
www.cambridge.org /catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521637511   (267 words)

  
 Wikinfo | NATO phonetic alphabet
The NATO phonetic alphabet was developed in the 1950s by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to be intelligible (and pronounceable) to all pilots and operators of civil aircraft.
It replaced other phonetic alphabets, for example the US military Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet ("able baker") and several versions of RAF phonetic alphabets.
It is sometimes inappropriately referred to as International Phonetic Alphabet, which is actually the official name of an alphabet used in linguistics created in the late nineteeth century.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=NATO_phonetic_alphabet   (544 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
The IPA was first published in 1888 by the Association Phonétique Internationale (International Phonetic Association), a group of French language teachers founded by Paul Passy.
The aim of the organisation was to devise a system for transcribing the sounds of speech which was independent of any particular language and applicable to all languages.
A phonetic script for English created in 1847 by Isaac Pitman and Henry Ellis was used a a model for the IPA.
www.omniglot.com /writing/ipa.htm   (206 words)

  
 Verentian Phonetic Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The work of the scholars of Tirreter was to produce what today we call a phonetic alphabet.
Consonant symbols, of diminutive size, are artistically arranged to fill the space around the vowel, but also located to indicate whether the consonant occurs before or after the vowel.
To date there are 28 consonant sounds present as standard symbols in the phonetic alphabet.
www.cs.pdx.edu /~kenstcyr/Sevalia/language.html   (217 words)

  
 yourDictionary.com • Library: The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The International Phonetic Alphabet was created by the International Phonetic Association (also IPA), formed by a group of English and French linguists way back in 1886.
The alphabet has gone through several revisions: while the bulk of it is based on the 1989 Kiel Convention, some changes were made as late as 1996.
As language enthusiasts and polyglots become aware of the usefulness of the International Phonetic Alphabet, there will be more people using a precise means of transcribing the sounds of the world's languages.
www.yourdictionary.com /library/ipa.html   (2051 words)

  
 NATO Phonetic Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The NATO Phonetic Alphabet was developed in the 1950s to be intelligible (and pronounceable) to all NATO allies in the heat of battle.
It replaced other phonetic alphabets, for example the US military "able baker" alphabet.
The NATO Phonetic Alphabet is now widely used in business and telecommunications in Europe and North America.
www.dynamoo.com /technical/phonetic.htm   (112 words)

  
 IPA Handbook
The Handbook of the International Phonetic Association was published by Cambridge University Press in July of 1999 and is being regularly reprinted in both hardback and paperback.
Electronic files of the Chart of the IPA, the Number Chart of the IPA, and the Chart of 'Extensions' to the International Phonetic Alphabet are available for viewing and printing here.
These audio files are licensed to the IPA by their authors and accompany the phonetic descriptions published in the Handbook of the IPA or in the Journal of the IPA.
web.uvic.ca /ling/resources/ipa/handbook.htm   (742 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet
Since I wrote this article, John Welles has informed me of a number of good pages, including the excellent SAMPA and The IPA in Unicode.
A while back, I mentioned that Magnetic Phonetics is a nice little product.
I found these usage examples more useful than the charts offered at the official International Phonetic Association website.
www.mathpuzzle.com /IPA.html   (514 words)

  
 SAMPA computer readable phonetic alphabet
SAMPA (Speech Assessment Methods Phonetic Alphabet) is a machine-readable phonetic alphabet.
SAMPA basically consists of a mapping of symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet onto ASCII codes in the range 33..127, the 7-bit printable ASCII characters.
A proposal for an extended version of the segmental alphabet, X-SAMPA, extends the basic agreed conventions so as to make provision for every symbol on the Chart of the International Phonetic Association, including all diacritics.
www.phon.ucl.ac.uk /home/sampa   (875 words)

  
 Ancient Scripts: Phonetics
As you know, the English alphabet is far from being a regular and consistent system of representing all the sounds in English.
The most famous one is the International Phonetic Alphabet or IPA, but the American Phonetic Alphabet is also quite widespread.
Notice how the 'a' (phonetically [æ]) sounds longer in "sad" than in "sat".
www.ancientscripts.com /phonetics.html   (1652 words)

  
 The Phonetic Alphabet
For the purposes of the Phonetic Alphabet, these letters can be classified as one phonetic sound.
There are ten groups of basic phonetic sounds, and each group is paired against one of the ten digits 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0.
When you are consistently getting all the answers correct, you have mastered the Phonetic Alphabet, and ready to learn how to transpose numbers into words.
www.sharpsoftware.co.uk /pin/page1.html   (327 words)

  
 Alphapage.html - University of Maryland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
This page is part of the course material for "History of the Alphabets" taught by Prof.
Questions of an academic or linguistic nature should be e-mailed to Prof.
The authors cannot comment on the religious or mystical nature of alphabets and letters.
www.wam.umd.edu /~rfradkin/alphapage.html   (244 words)

  
 SAMPA computer readable phonetic alphabet
Under the aegis of COCOSDA it is hoped to extend it to cover many other languages (and in principle all languages).
A recent proposal for an extended version of the segmental alphabet, X-SAMPA, would extend the presently agreed conventions so as to make provision for every symbol on the Chart of the International Phonetic Association, including all diacritics.
All IPA symbols that coincide with lower-case letters of the Latin alphabet remain the same; all other symbols are recoded within the ASCII range 37..126.
victorian.fortunecity.com /vangogh/555/Spell/sampa.htm   (1128 words)

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