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In the News (Sat 25 May 19)

  
  Socrates
As a pupil of Archelaus during his youth, Socrates showed a great deal of interest in the scientific theories of Anaxagoras, but he later abandoned inquiries into the physical world for a dedicated investigation of the development of moral character.
Unlike the professional Sophists of the time, Socrates pointedly declined to accept payment for his work with students, but despite (or, perhaps, because) of this lofty disdain for material success, many of them were fanatically loyal to him.
Although his direct answer is that virtue is unteachable, Socrates does propose the doctrine of recollection to explain why we nevertheless are in possession of significant knowledge about such matters.
www.philosophypages.com /ph/socr.htm   (736 words)

  
  The Suicide of Socrates, 399 BC
Socrates' accusers (three Athenian citizens) were allotted three hours to present their case, after which, the philosopher would have three hours to defend himself.
Socrates was given the opportunity to suggest his own punishment and could probably have avoided death by recommending exile.
Socrates walked around until he said that his legs were becoming heavy, when he lay on his back, as the attendant instructed.
www.eyewitnesstohistory.com /socrates.htm   (922 words)

  
  Socrates. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Socrates was the son of Sophroniscus, a sculptor.
In that speech Socrates maintained that he was puzzled by this acclaim until he discovered that, while others professed knowledge without realizing their ignorance, he at least was aware of his own ignorance.
Socrates became convinced that his calling was to search for wisdom about right conduct by which he might guide the intellectual and moral improvement of the Athenians.
www.bartleby.com /65/so/Socrates.html   (743 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Socrates left no writings; we know him only from the writings of his contemporary Xenophon, references to his military career in Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War though he was also presented as a caricature of a generic sophist by his contemporary Aristophanes in his play The Clouds.
Socrates lived during a time of transition from the height of Athenian Empire to her defeat by Sparta and its coalition.
Socrates himself fought in Potidea, the Battle of Delium and the Battle of Amphipolis.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/s/so/socrates_1.html   (679 words)

  
 Socrates - MSN Encarta
Socrates believed in the superiority of argument over writing and therefore spent the greater part of his mature life in the marketplace and public places of Athens, engaging in dialogue and argument with anyone who would listen or who would submit to interrogation.
Socrates was obedient to the laws of Athens, but he generally steered clear of politics, restrained by what he believed to be divine warning.
Socrates was also the teacher of Aristippus, who founded the Cyrenaic philosophy of experience and pleasure, from which developed the more lofty philosophy of Epicurus.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761573200/Socrates.html   (765 words)

  
 Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Socrates   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Socrates himself attested that he, having learned to live with Xanthippe, would be able to cope with any other human being (supposedly), just as a horse trainer accustomed to wilder horses might be more competent than one not.
Socrates lived during the time of the transition from the height of the Athenian Empire to its decline after its defeat by Sparta and its allies in the Peloponnesian War.
Socrates was found guilty as charged, and sentenced to death by hemlock.
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Socrates   (5778 words)

  
 Socrates - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Most of what is now known about Socrates is derived from information that recurs across various contemporary sources: the dialogues written by Plato, one of Socrates' students; the works of Xenophon, one of his contemporaries; and writings by Aristophanes and Aristotle.
For this, Socrates is customarily regarded as the father of political philosophy and ethics or moral philosophy, and as a fountainhead of all the main themes in Western philosophy in general.
Socrates explains that he is himself barren of theories, but knows how to bring the theories of others to birth and determine whether they are worthy or mere "wind eggs".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Socrates   (3336 words)

  
 Socrates - Crystalinks
Socrates himself attested that he, having learned to live with Xanthippe, would be able to cope with any other human being (supposedly), just as a horse trainer accustomed to wilder horses might be more competent than one not.
Socrates was found guilty as charged, and sentenced to death by hemlock.It is interesting to note that Socrates had every opportunity to escape, as his followers could have easily bribed the prison guards.
For this, Socrates is customarily regarded as the father of political philosophy and ethics or moral philosophy, and as a fountainhead of all the main themes in Western philosophy in general.
www.crystalinks.com /socrates.html   (2529 words)

  
 Greek Philosophy: Socrates
Socrates was brought to trial and executed in 399.
Socrates' method of philosophical inquiry consisted in questioning people on the positions they asserted and working them through questions into a contradiction, thus proving to them that their original assertion was wrong.
Socrates and Plato refer to this method of questioning as elenchus, which means something like "cross-examination" The Socratic elenchus eventually gave rise to dialectic, the idea that truth needs to be pursued by modifying one's position through questioning and conflict with opposing ideas.
www.wsu.edu /~dee/GREECE/SOCRATES.HTM   (663 words)

  
 Socrates (Drank the Conium)
Socrates sounded like several bands that were popular at the time, Jimi Hendrix Experience, Deep Purple, Blue Cheer, and Black Sabbath come to mind now when I hear their music from that early period, though the majority of their material was original.
Socrates made two albums as a three-piece, both pretty awful because of poor mixing and mastering though the songs and performances were good.
Socrates with their long hair, beards and high-energy blues and rock and roll were a window on the world outside and the reason people crammed into the Kittaro every weekend.
athensguide.com /socrates   (1268 words)

  
 Socrates
Socrates is frequently described as a "mystic," the meaning of this term varying with the biographer.
Socrates, opposing these materialistic thinkers, became the leader of a new movement in which the existence of real knowledge and the inherent dignity of the human soul were the leading ideas.
The real offense of Socrates was in teaching to his disciples the arcane doctrines of the Mysteries, betraying secrets which were "never to be revealed under the penalty of death." But Socrates had never been initiated and is hardly to be regarded as guilty of intentional profanation.
www.wisdomworld.org /additional/ancientlandmarks/Socrates.html   (3102 words)

  
 Malaspina Great Books - Socrates (469 BCE-399 BCE)
For this, Socrates is customarily regarded as the father and fountainhead for ethics or moral philosophy,; and hence philosophy in general.
Socrates appeared in other plays by Aristophanes such as The Birds because of his being a philodorian, and also in plays by Callias,; Eupolis and Telecleides,; in all of which Socrates and the Sophists were criticised for "the moral dangers inherent in contemporary thought and literature".
Socrates does not question everyone - his daemon differentiates -- it is not always apparent why; Buddha directs his teaching to the man of understanding; Confucius directs his teaching to the man of talent; Jesus directs his message towards the dispossessed, and the despised.
www.malaspina.org /home.asp?topic=./search/details&lastpage=./search/results&ID=432   (6786 words)

  
 Bio of Socrates, Philosopher of Wisdom
Socrates' method of philosophical inquiry consisted in questioning people on the positions they asserted and working them through questions into a contradiction, thus proving to them that their original assertion was wrong.
Socrates and Plato refer to this method of questioning as elenchus, which means something like "cross-examination" The Socratic elenchus eventually gave rise to dialectic, the idea that truth needs to be pursued by modifying one's position through questioning and conflict with opposing ideas.
Socrates is admired by many philosophers for his willingness to explore an argument wherever it would lead as well as having the moral courage to follow its conclusion.
www.briantaylor.com /Socrates.htm   (959 words)

  
 Philosophers : Socrates   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Socrates is described as having neglected his own affairs, instead spending his time discussing virtue, justice, and piety wherever his fellow citizens congregated, seeking wisdom about right conduct so that he might guide the moral and intellectual improvement of Athens.
In 399 B.C. Socrates was tried for corrupting the morals of Athenian youth and for religious heresies; it is now believed that his arrest stemmed in particular from his influence on Alcibiades and Critias, who had betrayed Athens.
The trial and death of Socrates are described by Plato in the Apology, Crito, and Phaedo.
www.trincoll.edu /depts/phil/philo/phils/socrates.html   (279 words)

  
 Socrates - History for Kids!
Socrates was the first of the three great Athenian philosophers (the other two are Plato and Aristotle).
Socrates was born in Athens in 469 BC, so he lived through the time of Pericles and the Athenian Empire, though he was too young to remember Marathon or Salamis.
But when Socrates was in his forties or so, he began to feel an urge to think about the world around him, and try to answer some difficult questions.
www.historyforkids.org /learn/greeks/philosophy/socrates.htm   (709 words)

  
 Socrates (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Socrates was usually to be found in the marketplace and other public areas, conversing with a variety of different people—young and old, male and female, slave and free, rich and poor—that is, with virtually anyone he could persuade to join with him in his question-and-answer mode of probing serious matters.
Socrates alone among the Prytanes was left standing for the law and the generals; his refusal to allow the vote had the effect of allowing one last, eloquent speech from the floor that proposed a preliminary vote to decide between sentencing the group and permitting separate trials (Xenophon, Hellenica 1.7.16-33).
Socrates had the right to challenge the admissibility of the accusation in relation to existing law, but he did not, so the charge was published on whitened tablets in the agora and a date was set for the pre-trial examination.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/socrates   (9810 words)

  
 Greek Philosophy: Socrates
Socrates was brought to trial and executed in 399.
Socrates' method of philosophical inquiry consisted in questioning people on the positions they asserted and working them through questions into a contradiction, thus proving to them that their original assertion was wrong.
Socrates and Plato refer to this method of questioning as elenchus, which means something like "cross-examination" The Socratic elenchus eventually gave rise to dialectic, the idea that truth needs to be pursued by modifying one's position through questioning and conflict with opposing ideas.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/GREECE/SOCRATES.HTM   (663 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Socrates
Because of the pretended deference which Socrates payed to the superior intelligence of his pupil, this stage of the method was called "Socratic Irony".
Socrates was profoundly convinced of the immortality of the soul, although in his address to his judges he argues against
In the absence of primary sources -- Socrates, apparently, never wrote anything -- we are obliged to rely on these writers and on a few references of Aristotle for our knowledge of what Socrates taught.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/14119a.htm   (1047 words)

  
 Socrates (470 - 399 B.C.)
Socrates claimed to have been told by an oracle that he was the wisest person in all of Athens.
Socrates was not afraid to associate with those who were in need of his influence, and these shady associations worked against him at his trial.
Socrates, however, suggested as his punishment that the City pay for free meals for him for the rest of his life and set him up in one of the plushest parts of town.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Forum/8740/Socrates.htm   (1154 words)

  
 Socrates - Wikiquote
Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.
The words of Socrates, as quoted or portrayed in Plato's works, which are the most extensive source available for our present knowledge about his ideas.
And if the fool, or the pig, are of a different opinion, it is because they only know their own side of the question.
en.wikiquote.org /wiki/Socrates   (2607 words)

  
 The Last Days of Socrates   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Socrates was a stone cutter by trade, even though there is little evidence that he did much to make a living.
Although Socrates went to great lengths to distinguish himself from the sophists, it is unlikely that his fellow Athenians made such a distinction in their minds.
Socrates is admired by many philosophers for his willingness to explore an argument wherever it would lead as well as having the moral courage to follow its conclusion.
socrates.clarke.edu /aplg0260.htm   (208 words)

  
 Mr. Dowling's Greek Philosophy Page
Socrates concluded that while others professed knowledge they did not have, he knew how little he knew.
Socrates' students wrote that he believed that evil is ignorance, and that virtue could be taught.
Socrates regarded the tales of the gods as an invention of the poets.
www.mrdowling.com /701-socrates.html   (303 words)

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