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Topic: Virus


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  Antivirus Software Vendors | Virus Removal | Business.com
Developer of Virus Interdiction Program for cc: Mail designed to stop the spread of viruses in organizations that connect to the Internet.
A Network Associates company that develops computer virus detection, identification and disinfection tools for all major operating systems, Groupware applications and e-mail.
Provider of a family of server-based security applications, including virus scanning, content security, spam filtering, domain blocking, text scanning and encryption.
rd.business.com /index.asp?epm=s.1&bdcq=Virus&bdcr=1&bdcu=http://www.business.com/directory/computers_and_software/security/software/virus_protection/index.asp?partner=2662601&bdcp=&partner=2662601&bdcs=nwuuid-2662601-2A37CE22-C5FE-4590-76E8-D177EECE4E46-ym   (737 words)

  
  Apple - Support - Small Number of Video iPods Shipped With Windows Virus
This known virus affects only Windows computers, and up to date anti-virus software which is included with most Windows computers should detect and remove it.
Because this Windows virus propagates via mass storage devices, we recommend that you scan any mass storage devices that you have recently attached to your Windows computers such as external hard drives, digital cameras with removable media, and USB flash drives.
While this Windows virus does not affect Mac OS X or the iPod itself, Mac customers can use iTunes 7 to easily restore the software on their newly purchased Video iPod to ensure that it does not carry this Windows virus.
www.apple.com /support/windowsvirus   (477 words)

  
  Virus (life science) - MSN Encarta
The virus replication cycle can be as short as a couple of hours for certain small viruses or as long as several days for some large viruses.
Eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus, an alphavirus, replicates in mosquitoes and is transmitted to wild birds when the mosquitoes feed.
Thus, wild birds and perhaps mammals and reptiles serve as the virus reservoir, and mosquitoes serve as vectors essential to the virus life cycle by ensuring transmission of the virus from one host to another.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761575740/Virus_(life_science).html   (2047 words)

  
  Virus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A virus that infects bacteria is known as a bacteriophage, often shortened to phage.
In the case of the hepatitis B virus the T-number is 4, therefore 240 proteins assemble to form the capsid.
Virus self-assembly within host cells also has implications for the study of the origin of life, as it lends credence to the hypothesis that life could have started as self-assembling organic molecules.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Virus   (4536 words)

  
 Computer virus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In common parlance, the term virus is often extended to refer to worms, trojan horses and other sorts of malware; viruses in the narrow sense of the word are less common than they used to be, compared to other forms of malware.
The term "virus" is often used in common parlance to describe all kinds of malware (malicious software), including those that are more properly classified as worms or trojans.
If the virus is encrypted with a different key for each infected file, the only part of the virus that remains constant is the decrypting module, which would (for example) be appended to the end.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Computer_virus   (5293 words)

  
 Virus Bulletin : Privacy statement
Virus Bulletin will provide you with up to date information on the functionality of the Site and advice and assistance on any upgrade or changes to its functionality as it deems necessary and use reasonable endeavours to comply with any applicable law or regulation.
Virus Bulletin assumes no responsibility and shall not be liable for any damage to or viruses that may infect your computer equipment or other property on account of your access to, use of, or browsing in the Site.
Virus Bulletin 's liability shall not be limited in the case of death or personally injury directly caused by Virus Bulletin’s negligent act or omission.
www.virusbtn.com /about/terms   (1465 words)

  
 virus. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
A free virus particle may be thought of as a packaging device by which viral genetic material can be introduced into appropriate host cells, which the virus can recognize by means of proteins on its outermost surface.
Release of virus particles from the host may occur by lysis of the host cell, as in bacteria, or by budding from the host cell’s surface that provides the envelope of membrane-enveloped forms.
Some human diseases are apparently caused by the body’s response to virus infection: immune reaction to altered virus-infected cells, release by infected cells of inflammatory substances, or circulation in the body of virus-antibody complexes are all virus-caused immunological disorders.
www.bartleby.com /65/vi/virus.html   (922 words)

  
 NBC 4 - Health Encyclopedia - West Nile Virus
West Nile virus is transmitted by mosquitos and causes an illness that ranges from mild to severe.
It is possible for an infected mother to transmit the virus to her child via breast milk.
Rarely, a sample of blood or CSF may be sent to a lab to be cultured to evaluate the presence of West Nile virus.
www.nbc4.tv /encyclopedia/6865354/detail.html   (1109 words)

  
 Bugs in the News - What the Heck is a Virus?
A virus is not a bacterium, nor an independently-living organism.
The virus uses the cell's machinery and some of the cell's enzymes to generate virus parts which are later assembled into thousands of new, mature, infectious virus which can leave the cell to infect other cells.
A virus enters a cell by first attaching to a specific structure on the cell's surface via a specific structure on the virus surface.
people.ku.edu /~jbrown/virus.html   (1463 words)

  
 Virus definition - Medical and health information on the common cold and flu
A virus invades living cells and uses their chemical machinery to keep itself alive and to replicate itself.
Herpes simplex virus and the hepatitis- B virus are DNA viruses.
The Dutch microbiologist Martinus Beijerinck (1851-1931) was the first person to use the term "virus" for the invisible disease-causing material that he showed to be self-replicating.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5997   (472 words)

  
 Introduction to the Viruses
But when a dormant virus is stimulated, it enters the lytic phase: new viruses are formed, self-assemble, and burst out of the host cell, killing the cell and going on to infect other cells.
Even a hypothetical virus that could infect and kill all dinosaurs, 65 million years ago, could not have infected the ammonites or foraminifera that also went extinct at the same time.
Viruses also carry out natural "genetic engineering": a virus may incorporate some genetic material from its host as it is replicating, and transfer this genetic information to a new host, even to a host unrelated to the previous host.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu /alllife/virus.html   (638 words)

  
 Virus Structure
The discovery that virus particles could form spontaneously from purified subunits without any extraneous information indicated that the particle was in the free energy minimum state and was therefore the favoured structure of the components.
The second problem the virus must overcome is to achieve the specificity required to select and encapsidate the virus genome from the large background of cellular nucleic acids.
The function of the virus capsid is not only to protect the genome, but also to deliver it to a suitable host cell and more specifically, the appropriate compartment of the host cell (in the case of eukaryote hosts) to allow replication to proceed.
www.microbiologybytes.com /introduction/structure.html   (2761 words)

  
 Virus Structure
The discovery that virus particles could form spontaneously from purified subunits without any extraneous information indicated that the particle was in the free energy minimum state and was therefore the favoured structure of the components.
The second problem the virus must overcome is to achieve the specificity required to select and encapsidate the virus genome from the large background of cellular nucleic acids.
The function of the virus capsid is not only to protect the genome, but also to deliver it to a suitable host cell and more specifically, the appropriate compartment of the host cell (in the case of eukaryote hosts) to allow replication to proceed.
www-micro.msb.le.ac.uk /109/structure.html   (2769 words)

  
 ICTVdB Virus Description - 01.025.0.01.001. Lake Victoria marburgvirus
This is a description of a vertebrate virus at the species level.
Virus infects during its life cycle a single type of vertebrate host.
All virus descriptions are based on the character list and natural language translations from the encoded descriptions are automatically generated and formatted for display on the Web.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov /ICTVdb/ICTVdB/25010001.htm   (817 words)

  
 LiveScience.com - Inside Look: How Viruses Invade Us
Little extensions on the virus are called antigens, which help the virus hunt down the target host cell [3-D anatomy of HIV].
A virus does contain some genetic information critical for making copies of itself, but it can't get the job done without the help of a cell's duplicating equipment, borrowing enzymes and other molecules to concoct more virus.
Proteins on the surface of the virus recognize its target by the proteins or sugars on the surface of the host cell.
www.livescience.com /humanbiology/060605_mm_virus_infect.html   (1643 words)

  
 Coxsackie Viruses
Hand, foot, and mouth disease, a type of coxsackie virus syndrome, causes painful red blisters in the throat and on the tongue, gums, inside of the cheeks, and the palms of hands and soles of the feet.
Herpangina, a coxsackie virus infection of the throat, causes red-ringed blisters and ulcers on the tonsils and soft palate, the fleshy back portion of the roof of the mouth.
Children who are sick with a coxsackie virus should be kept out of school or child care for a few days to avoid spreading the infection.
kidshealth.org /parent/infections/bacterial_viral/coxsackie.html   (1074 words)

  
 Information Security Glossary - Virus
A virus is a form of malicious code and, as such it is potentially disruptive.
The term Virus includes all sort of variations on a theme, including the nastier variants of macro-viruses, Trojans, and Worms, but, for convenience, all such programs are classed simply as 'virus'.
Organisations should maintain a 'virus diary' of known high risk dates/times to ensure that anti-virus measures are in place as required.
www.yourwindow.to /information-security/gl_virus.htm   (408 words)

  
 An Overview of Computer Viruses and Antivirus Software
A virus is simply a computer program that is intentionally written to attach itself to other programs or disk boot sectors and replicate whenever those programs are executed or those infected disks are accessed.
The Junkie virus was alive in the boot sector of the diskette that I inadvertently left in the drive, and it ran wild when I accidentally tried to boot from it.
Patricia Hoffman's VSUM: Virus Information Summary List is an hypertext compendium of virus information, including what a virus does, how to detect it, how to clean it, where it came from, etc. VSUM is a copyrighted work that may not be used by a business, corporation, organization, government, or agency environment without a site license.
www.hicom.net /~oedipus/virus32.html   (4238 words)

  
 Virus information and help
The first virus was written by Fred Cohen in 1983, and later coined in a 1984 research paper.
Because some viruses are memory resident, as soon as a diskette or program is loaded into memory, the virus then attaches itself into memory and then is capable of infecting any file on the computer you have access to.
As mentioned earlier a virus is capable of being either memory resident where the virus first loads into memory and then infects a computer or non-memory resident where the virus code is only executed each time a file is opened.
www.computerhope.com /vlist.htm   (1395 words)

  
 Howstuffworks "How Computer Viruses Work"
Back in March 1999, the Melissa virus was so powerful that it forced Microsoft and a number of other very large companies to completely turn off their e-mail systems until the virus could be contained.
A virus is a fragment of DNA inside a protective jacket.
Unlike a cell, a virus has no way to do anything or to reproduce by itself -- it is not alive.
computer.howstuffworks.com /virus.htm   (715 words)

  
 Virus
A virus is a piece of software designed and written to adversely affect your computer by altering the way it works without your knowledge or permission.
In more technical terms, a virus is a segment of program code that implants itself to one of your executable files and spreads systematically from one file to another.
A malignant virus is one that attempts to inflict malicious damage to your computer, although the damage may not be intentional.
www.acsworld.net /virus.htm   (1727 words)

  
 virus - Wiktionary
The word virus is derived from the Latin virus, meaning roughly "poison", "slime" or "venom", and still retains this meaning.
A core of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat that requires a living cell to replicate — often causes disease in the host organism.
A computer virus; often mistakenly used where malware would be the correct word.
en.wiktionary.org /wiki/virus   (76 words)

  
 New virus infects PCs, whacks SCO | CNET News.com
A mass-mailing virus that has quickly spread around the Internet uses victims' computers to launch a massive denial-of-service attack on the controversial SCO Group.
Once the virus infects a Windows-running PC, it installs a program that allows the computer to be controlled remotely.
The virus also copies itself to the Kazaa download directory on PCs, on which the file-sharing program is loaded.
news.com.com /2100-7349_3-5147605.html   (663 words)

  
 NBC5.com - Health Encyclopedia - West Nile Virus
More severe forms of disease, which can be life-threatening, may be called West Nile encephalitis or West Nile meningitis, depending on where it spreads.
West Nile virus may also be spread through blood transfusions and organ transplantation.
Complications from mild West Nile virus infection are extremely rare.
www.nbc5.com /encyclopedia/6865354/detail.html   (1108 words)

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